And sometimes so are you.

Ever notice how there isn’t much that you can suggest where everybody automatically agrees with you?

It’s pretty much impossible.

Whether  you are taking a meeting notes, suggesting a restaurant for dinner, are coming up with ideas for a vacation —  if you fill a room with people, you’re going to get a lot of different opinions.

Which can be overwhelming if you don’t know what to do.  No matter how hard you try to build consensus, you find out all too quickly that it only takes one stray opinion to bring the entire house of cards down on itself.

In these moments it’s helpful to remember that the only opinion that really matters is yours.

Everyone else’s opinion is stupid (kinda).

You can spend time justifying, rationalizing, tolerating, or excusing away the opinions of others, but ultimately you come down to a simple fact of flawed human nature — inherently we are unreasonable mammals.

Our opinions are all too often irrationally unreasonable.

Emotions like fear and pride limit our ability to agree on basic non-threatening activities that are mutually beneficial.  So it’s comforting to remember that everybody else’s opinion is stupid.

But so is yours.

At times, fear and failure, pride and waning self-confidence get in the way of you being reasonable. And so you act stupid.

You force your opinions on other people when the better thing to do is just shut up and help a good idea go good places.

That would be the right thing to do. The noble thing to do. (But usually not the easiest thing).

It’s not what comes naturally. What comes naturally is to be stupid. To argue and fight and jockey for glory.

Sometimes that’s a thought worth thinking about.

About you not being stupid this time. About you intentionally squashing the emotions that limit your ability to do the right thing.

Doing that — well that’s not stupid at all.