Myth: Thinking Actually Helps

myth

High-performers in the world of “deal making” share the universal quality of self-assessment. It’s an internal process of strategically measuring the inputs and outputs of a process or idea (or just “what went down…”) and deciding if it could be done better.  And that’s all good.  It’s more than good — it’s necessary.

But it’s probably not good enough to make you an ALL-STAR (the stuff of legends)

You work better when you work with gut instinct.  At this stage in your deal process, you generally know what NOT to do (which is 2/3 of the learning process) and WHERE you need to head.  But to be the best, you have to be extraordinary — and that requires a different, new, or abstractly innovative idea.  Everything that your boss won’t probably agree with…. because it’s not safe.

But there’s actually science to prove that you do make better decisions from gut instinct rather than thinking too much.

“Whether evaluating abstract objects (Chinese ideograms) or actual consumer items (paintings, apartments, and jellybeans), people who deliberated on their preferences were less consistent than those who made non-deliberative judgments,” write authors Loran F. Nordgren (Northwestern University) and Ap Dijksterhuis (Radboud University, The Netherlands).”

And check this out.  The science gets even more compelling.  After 5 different independent studies, the authors found that “the more complex the decision, the less useful deliberation became.”

That means that less “thought-manship” and more gut instinct is the key to outrageous deal success.

P.S.  Ever wonder why outrageous success is so hard to predict (i.e. there’s no formula)?  It’s because you’re thinking too hard about it.  As you move with gut instinct you see enough of the distance to move around obstacles to get to the finish line.  And, like running at the North Pole, you don’t really need to look over your shoulder because your competition is slim…. (and that’s where I like to play)

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0 Replies to “Myth: Thinking Actually Helps”

  1. Provocative post, Dan. It doesn’t surprise me, coming from you. (Meant as a compliment.)I know that I have done some of my my best work while facing “I have no idea where to go with this.” And when what happened next was surprisingly successful, I would believe I was lucky and once again pulled it out of [a dark place]. Actually, what seems to have happened is that I allowed my instinct/intuition run with it and I had the courage and trust in myself, without applying a “reasonableness” test. A few times it even turned out to be a new invention or process, which becomes applicable in the future.
    It’s coincidental that I’ve just begun to use this tag line, source anonymous, at the end of my emails:”When you come to the edge of all the light you have known and you are about to step out into the darkness, faith is knowing that one of two things will happen: there will be something to stand on, or you will be taught how to fly.”

  2. Provocative post, Dan. It doesn’t surprise me, coming from you. (Meant as a compliment.)I know that I have done some of my my best work while facing “I have no idea where to go with this.” And when what happened next was surprisingly successful, I would believe I was lucky and once again pulled it out of [a dark place]. Actually, what seems to have happened is that I allowed my instinct/intuition run with it and I had the courage and trust in myself, without applying a “reasonableness” test. A few times it even turned out to be a new invention or process, which becomes applicable in the future.
    It’s coincidental that I’ve just begun to use this tag line, source anonymous, at the end of my emails:”When you come to the edge of all the light you have known and you are about to step out into the darkness, faith is knowing that one of two things will happen: there will be something to stand on, or you will be taught how to fly.”

  3. Provocative post, Dan. It doesn’t surprise me, coming from you. (Meant as a compliment.)I know that I have done some of my my best work while facing “I have no idea where to go with this.” And when what happened next was surprisingly successful, I would believe I was lucky and once again pulled it out of [a dark place]. Actually, what seems to have happened is that I allowed my instinct/intuition run with it and I had the courage and trust in myself, without applying a “reasonableness” test. A few times it even turned out to be a new invention or process, which becomes applicable in the future.
    It’s coincidental that I’ve just begun to use this tag line, source anonymous, at the end of my emails:”When you come to the edge of all the light you have known and you are about to step out into the darkness, faith is knowing that one of two things will happen: there will be something to stand on, or you will be taught how to fly.”

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