Re-Feeding Your Addiction.

It might be hard to admit but addiction plays a significant role in all the decisions that you make each day. Your addiction decides for you whether you relentlessly pursue bold ideas of whether you give in to how your brain subconsciously makes decisions.
Which drives an important question.

What are you addicted to?

Usually, we’re good at focusing any discussion about addiction towards personal vices like gambling or alcohol, drugs or pornography. Addictions that are socially unacceptable. Addictions that dramatically impact other people around you negatively.

What is left out of the discussion are the addictions that drive those addictions. The reason behind the sickness.

We’re not good at admitting the ugly, gritty side of under-performance that robs us of our true potential.

  1. We’re addicted to fear.
  2. We’re addicted to making excuses.
  3. We’re addicted to passive aggression.
  4. We’re addicted to selfishness.
  5. We’re addicted to listening to the crowd.
  6. We’re addicted to caring less.
  7. We’re addicted to taking the easy way out.

They’re socially acceptable addictions.

Addictions that we let others get away with because we see them in ourselves.

We excuse them away as if the frailty of our humanity is a worthy excuse for our inadequacies.

And the truth is clear that they are not.  Being human does not demand that you live broken.  That you let your weaknesses drive your behavior.

The simple truth is that you can feed a different addiction.

What about being addicted to greatness?  What about choosing purpose over avoiding pain?

Your addiction is your decision.

You can’t change it all in a day.  Maybe not in a month or a year.

You are mighty because of your choice to choose what is hard over what is easy.

Rise up.

0 Replies to “Re-Feeding Your Addiction.”

  1. Very interesting perspective!  I never realized that I might be addicted to making excuses…But I do actively persue daily activities that I can be successful at accomplishing in order to get to the things that I am not as interested in doing.

  2. Very interesting perspective!  I never realized that I might be addicted to making excuses…But I do actively persue daily activities that I can be successful at accomplishing in order to get to the things that I am not as interested in doing.

  3. Very interesting perspective!  I never realized that I might be addicted to making excuses…But I do actively persue daily activities that I can be successful at accomplishing in order to get to the things that I am not as interested in doing.

  4. Very interesting perspective!  I never realized that I might be addicted to making excuses…But I do actively persue daily activities that I can be successful at accomplishing in order to get to the things that I am not as interested in doing.

  5. Very interesting perspective!  I never realized that I might be addicted to making excuses…But I do actively persue daily activities that I can be successful at accomplishing in order to get to the things that I am not as interested in doing.

  6. Very interesting perspective!  I never realized that I might be addicted to making excuses…But I do actively persue daily activities that I can be successful at accomplishing in order to get to the things that I am not as interested in doing.

  7. Dan, I really like the way you tied these principles together.
    Self-medicating through vice, selfishness, avoidance, procrastination or timidity is still medicating and while the direct impact of the selfishness and timidity category may be less apparent at first, it still diminishes our capacity to make genuine connections and reach our potential as individuals. 

    Powerful post. Keep up the good work.

  8. Dan, I really like the way you tied these principles together.
    Self-medicating through vice, selfishness, avoidance, procrastination or timidity is still medicating and while the direct impact of the selfishness and timidity category may be less apparent at first, it still diminishes our capacity to make genuine connections and reach our potential as individuals. 

    Powerful post. Keep up the good work.

  9. Dan, I really like the way you tied these principles together.
    Self-medicating through vice, selfishness, avoidance, procrastination or timidity is still medicating and while the direct impact of the selfishness and timidity category may be less apparent at first, it still diminishes our capacity to make genuine connections and reach our potential as individuals. 

    Powerful post. Keep up the good work.

  10. Dan, I really like the way you tied these principles together.
    Self-medicating through vice, selfishness, avoidance, procrastination or timidity is still medicating and while the direct impact of the selfishness and timidity category may be less apparent at first, it still diminishes our capacity to make genuine connections and reach our potential as individuals. 

    Powerful post. Keep up the good work.

  11. Dan, I really like the way you tied these principles together.
    Self-medicating through vice, selfishness, avoidance, procrastination or timidity is still medicating and while the direct impact of the selfishness and timidity category may be less apparent at first, it still diminishes our capacity to make genuine connections and reach our potential as individuals. 

    Powerful post. Keep up the good work.

  12. Dan, I really like the way you tied these principles together.
    Self-medicating through vice, selfishness, avoidance, procrastination or timidity is still medicating and while the direct impact of the selfishness and timidity category may be less apparent at first, it still diminishes our capacity to make genuine connections and reach our potential as individuals. 

    Powerful post. Keep up the good work.

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