Why Asking Better Sales Questions Won’t Help You Close More Deals.

One of the most popular recent theories about business development is that if you ask better questions of your clients, you can uniquely uncover pain points that allow you to negotiate a more efficient close.
According to the experts, you improve your chances of closing the deal if you ask open-ended questions rather than asking questions that simply have a yes or no answer.

For instance, according to the experts it is better to ask “What has worked in the past?” over the simplistic “Did this work in the past?”.

Over the last decade, this theory has become a widely taught sales tactic.  Sales trainers all over the world have developed programs that help sales teams (both on the phone and in front of clients) ask questions that tip the odds in the favor of the salesperson closing the deal.

And after decades of proposing these ideas the experts still can’t explain why that strategy doesn’t seem to work consistently.

Better questions don’t lead to better sales performance.

Oh sure, there are always a few “big fish stories” where that tactic paid off and a salesperson emerges as a hero. But overall, why aren’t better questions helping us close bigger deals question

Why is it harder than ever right now to have meaningful conversations with potential prospects? Why is it so hard to generate revenue?

Well, the sales experts are well-meaning, but the behavior they prescribe is simply misguided.  The true impact of asking better questions is minimal on increased deals.  Sometimes this behavior even backfires, costing the company and the sales rep valuable business they would have otherwise landed.

So what does work?

And why is this focus on asking better questions so flawed?

Simply, the questions don’t really matter.

Caring matters.  That’s the secret to more sales.

Instead of teaching sales reps how to care about a prospect, sales experts teach you how to ask questions that help you pretend like you care.  That’s a huge difference.

But your business prospects are just as discerning as you are.  You don’t want to be around people that don’t really care about you.  You detest fake friends.

And so when you sit in front of a potential client and make your way through a list of questions that are designed to trap the client, is it any wonder that you fail to close the deal?

You expect more of the people that you interact with.

So do your prospects.

The solution then isn’t to train your team (or yourself) to ask questions that are more caring or kind.  The solution is to be a caring person.  To be humble yet confident.  To see people not as potential revenue but as fellow humans.

Instead of trying to close deals, close wounds. Prospects don’t really care about your presentation that much,. They just want their pain to go away.

Heal them.

Help them.

Along the way, you’re really helping yourself.

0 Replies to “Why Asking Better Sales Questions Won’t Help You Close More Deals.”

  1. Wow, “humble yet confident”, nailed it.  Very good posts – it’s human to human interaction, not a road map of key questions to ask that unlock a secret door.  To piggyback and add another one – discernment.  Is the time right to ask questions, less questions, or keep mouth shut and listen?  Each case is different.  

      1.  I really like this discussion. As I was reading the part about what isn’t working, I was asking myself…what does work?
        Before I read further, I remembered that I get/stay centered in the present moment…breathe…and set the intention to listen and speak from a place of integrity. (It’s easier to do that, if I have prepared like crazy for the meeting!)

        I’ve been aware of a quote form Neil  Rackham’s Spin Selling that says “it’s not about closing a sales…it’s about opening a relationship” I like the quote above of closing a wound.

        I really enjoy the hunt for new business, earning bonuses, pre-closing, asking for the order etc….but the best “close” of all, is to really connect with people and have them trust me enough to ask buying questions..like what would be our next step?

        Thanks for the great topic!

        Jeffrey Michael

  2. Wow, “humble yet confident”, nailed it.  Very good posts – it’s human to human interaction, not a road map of key questions to ask that unlock a secret door.  To piggyback and add another one – discernment.  Is the time right to ask questions, less questions, or keep mouth shut and listen?  Each case is different.  

      1.  I really like this discussion. As I was reading the part about what isn’t working, I was asking myself…what does work?
        Before I read further, I remembered that I get/stay centered in the present moment…breathe…and set the intention to listen and speak from a place of integrity. (It’s easier to do that, if I have prepared like crazy for the meeting!)

        I’ve been aware of a quote form Neil  Rackham’s Spin Selling that says “it’s not about closing a sales…it’s about opening a relationship” I like the quote above of closing a wound.

        I really enjoy the hunt for new business, earning bonuses, pre-closing, asking for the order etc….but the best “close” of all, is to really connect with people and have them trust me enough to ask buying questions..like what would be our next step?

        Thanks for the great topic!

        Jeffrey Michael

  3. Wow, “humble yet confident”, nailed it.  Very good posts – it’s human to human interaction, not a road map of key questions to ask that unlock a secret door.  To piggyback and add another one – discernment.  Is the time right to ask questions, less questions, or keep mouth shut and listen?  Each case is different.  

      1.  I really like this discussion. As I was reading the part about what isn’t working, I was asking myself…what does work?
        Before I read further, I remembered that I get/stay centered in the present moment…breathe…and set the intention to listen and speak from a place of integrity. (It’s easier to do that, if I have prepared like crazy for the meeting!)

        I’ve been aware of a quote form Neil  Rackham’s Spin Selling that says “it’s not about closing a sales…it’s about opening a relationship” I like the quote above of closing a wound.

        I really enjoy the hunt for new business, earning bonuses, pre-closing, asking for the order etc….but the best “close” of all, is to really connect with people and have them trust me enough to ask buying questions..like what would be our next step?

        Thanks for the great topic!

        Jeffrey Michael

  4. Wow, “humble yet confident”, nailed it.  Very good posts – it’s human to human interaction, not a road map of key questions to ask that unlock a secret door.  To piggyback and add another one – discernment.  Is the time right to ask questions, less questions, or keep mouth shut and listen?  Each case is different.  

      1.  I really like this discussion. As I was reading the part about what isn’t working, I was asking myself…what does work?
        Before I read further, I remembered that I get/stay centered in the present moment…breathe…and set the intention to listen and speak from a place of integrity. (It’s easier to do that, if I have prepared like crazy for the meeting!)

        I’ve been aware of a quote form Neil  Rackham’s Spin Selling that says “it’s not about closing a sales…it’s about opening a relationship” I like the quote above of closing a wound.

        I really enjoy the hunt for new business, earning bonuses, pre-closing, asking for the order etc….but the best “close” of all, is to really connect with people and have them trust me enough to ask buying questions..like what would be our next step?

        Thanks for the great topic!

        Jeffrey Michael

  5. Wow, “humble yet confident”, nailed it.  Very good posts – it’s human to human interaction, not a road map of key questions to ask that unlock a secret door.  To piggyback and add another one – discernment.  Is the time right to ask questions, less questions, or keep mouth shut and listen?  Each case is different.  

      1.  I really like this discussion. As I was reading the part about what isn’t working, I was asking myself…what does work?
        Before I read further, I remembered that I get/stay centered in the present moment…breathe…and set the intention to listen and speak from a place of integrity. (It’s easier to do that, if I have prepared like crazy for the meeting!)

        I’ve been aware of a quote form Neil  Rackham’s Spin Selling that says “it’s not about closing a sales…it’s about opening a relationship” I like the quote above of closing a wound.

        I really enjoy the hunt for new business, earning bonuses, pre-closing, asking for the order etc….but the best “close” of all, is to really connect with people and have them trust me enough to ask buying questions..like what would be our next step?

        Thanks for the great topic!

        Jeffrey Michael

  6. Wow, “humble yet confident”, nailed it.  Very good posts – it’s human to human interaction, not a road map of key questions to ask that unlock a secret door.  To piggyback and add another one – discernment.  Is the time right to ask questions, less questions, or keep mouth shut and listen?  Each case is different.  

      1.  I really like this discussion. As I was reading the part about what isn’t working, I was asking myself…what does work?
        Before I read further, I remembered that I get/stay centered in the present moment…breathe…and set the intention to listen and speak from a place of integrity. (It’s easier to do that, if I have prepared like crazy for the meeting!)

        I’ve been aware of a quote form Neil  Rackham’s Spin Selling that says “it’s not about closing a sales…it’s about opening a relationship” I like the quote above of closing a wound.

        I really enjoy the hunt for new business, earning bonuses, pre-closing, asking for the order etc….but the best “close” of all, is to really connect with people and have them trust me enough to ask buying questions..like what would be our next step?

        Thanks for the great topic!

        Jeffrey Michael

  7. Dan,  thanks for this post, you are clearly good with the word. My take away lesson: At the end of the day, we are all people. Prospects have needs to trust the solution providers they buy from, and we must build that from day 1 by showing that yes, we care. Regards.

  8. Dan,  thanks for this post, you are clearly good with the word. My take away lesson: At the end of the day, we are all people. Prospects have needs to trust the solution providers they buy from, and we must build that from day 1 by showing that yes, we care. Regards.

  9. Dan,  thanks for this post, you are clearly good with the word. My take away lesson: At the end of the day, we are all people. Prospects have needs to trust the solution providers they buy from, and we must build that from day 1 by showing that yes, we care. Regards.

  10. Dan,  thanks for this post, you are clearly good with the word. My take away lesson: At the end of the day, we are all people. Prospects have needs to trust the solution providers they buy from, and we must build that from day 1 by showing that yes, we care. Regards.

  11. Dan,  thanks for this post, you are clearly good with the word. My take away lesson: At the end of the day, we are all people. Prospects have needs to trust the solution providers they buy from, and we must build that from day 1 by showing that yes, we care. Regards.

  12. Dan,  thanks for this post, you are clearly good with the word. My take away lesson: At the end of the day, we are all people. Prospects have needs to trust the solution providers they buy from, and we must build that from day 1 by showing that yes, we care. Regards.

  13. Randall Wallace, the author of Braveheart, replied to his
    critics about the gross historical inaccuracy of his Fictional Film Character “Why
    let facts get in the way of a good story?”

    Did you go to the same school of journalism as Randall?

    The FACT is evidence can be produced which shows clearly the
    link between question type (and quality) and Sales Success.  i.e. both the content and the process of the questioning
    determine your sales success.

    The research which showed that there is NO difference
    between OPEN or CLOSED questions in sales success was published 25 years
    ago.  Anyone still believing Open/Closed
    or actually practicing Open/Closed still believes in the Tooth Fairy and that
    William Wallace painted his face (we stopped face painting in Scotland some 700
    years before Wallace, William that is and 1500 years before Randall)

    “To be humble yet confident” is an inane comment, unworthy
    of any thinking person talking with authority on Sales and Professional
    Selling.  It is more appropriate when
    advising unemployed people on their approach to Social Security and free
    Medi-care.

    Selling is a Profession. 
    Selling Skills are founded on Questioning techniques, which uncover not “Pain
    Points” but Customer Needs.  Sales
    Questioning, allows me, as an equal, to construct with my Customer a Value Proposition
    based on their needs and fulfilled by my Product or Service.  The outcome is Value generation for my Customer
    and just recompense for my Service.

    “Humble yet confident”, be damned! 

    Salespeople should be Competent and Effective for both their
    Customers and their Company.

    Next time do a little research; don’t just tell a good story
    or give an opinion!

    1. While your personal attacks are a smidge distracting, let me address the issues that you raise.  
      Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.  Doing just about anything better leads to being more successful.  But the analogies become silly pretty quickly.  You can become efficient at things that don’t really matter.  

      (e.g. How often are you now using those great ping pong skills from college?  At one time those skills were something that determined success…)

      Whether you are the master of open questions or stick with the closed, boring questions your sales effectiveness goes little beyond the degree to which your prospects think you care about them. The format you use matters somewhat.  That much is true.  

      But mastering interrogation techniques doesn’t mean that you position yourself to capture large business deals.  

      And while you decry humility, ego is one of the biggest self-limiting behaviors that sales people exhibit.  Instead of listening to what prospects are saying and caring about the success of the customer, sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just care more.

      Call it stupid.  Call it irrelevant. That still does not change the fact that care and humility trump tactics.  Every time.  

      The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience.  But they aren’t alone.  So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.

      These companies make a great story.  Each of them.  And that’s not my opinion.

      1. Let’s go back to your opinions, again. In your opinion “The true impact of asking better questions is minimal on increased deals.”  Well your opinion is wrong.  The evidence can be read in SPIN Selling published in 1987, and their study can be repeated by anyone who wishes to use a FACT, instead of an opinion.

         

        Nobody, who has done any research into “Open” and “Closed”
        questions prefers one type over the other. It simply is not a FACT that open
        questions get “more” information or “quality” than closed questions.

        Is your comment: “Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.”  Not simply completely at odds with your own article?

        Ping –Pong at college is an equivocation.

        Any “interrogation” is an absence of Selling Skills, further
        equivocation on your part.

        “Humility”, worse still “feigned Humility” has nothing to do with Professional Selling, no matter how often you express your opinion that it does.

        “Listening” is a fundamental part of the Sales Skill of Questioning,
        if you listen without questioning you are a Radio Audience, not a Salesperson.

        “Sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just caremore.” 

        If that was true Health care workers would be top of the sales tree, it’s simply a foolish false argument.  Which you have no evidence for, and you would
        find it difficult maybe impossible even to gain widespread agreement as to how “CARING” is defined.

        As for you master argument, your research, …….please!

        “The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience. But they aren’t alone. So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.”

        Amazon doesn’t care, it succeeds by removing obstacles to buying!  Southwestern (like Easyjet and Ryanair) succeeds on price.  Costco, which in
        Europe is a B2B seller, simply confuses the buyer into buying too much as it
        appears cheaper in bulk.  The common factor is not humility, or caring but simply better “offers”.  And, with little “selling” involved.

        Try Humble and Caring in B2B Customers : in IT, Big Software, Big Data, or Big Telco.  
        Leave humble where it belongs with Uriah Heep in Dickensian England.

        Salespeople, professionals need to learn how to use “Sales Questioning
        Skills”, and a whole range of Interactive Skills.  Sales Competence is having a Range of Interactive Skills to choose from and Choosing the most appropriate for the Customer Situation.

        1. Your brilliant cynicism is blinding you, @twitter-19037388:disqus , to the intention and tone of this article — and my blog overall.  

          Actions will never take you as far as attitudes.  You can call that my opinion.  That still doesn’t change that it is truth.  According to your logic, just because Neil Rackham wrote it down in a book, it must be truth.  

          So, we both have our belief systems.  And since I have generated tens of millions of dollars for myself being humble and kind — selling to IT, selling to attorneys, selling to CEO’s all over the world — I will continue to do so and decry anything else as incomparable.  

          And as for your belief that only a logical 7-step process for asking and answering questions is the best way to increase sells I ask you: “How small is that vision?”  

          Instead of improving on mediocrity, why not throw it out altogether and teach people how to think on their own?  The right attitudes and intentions always lead to the best actions and outcomes.  No one get’s it right the first time, but as long as you have the right attitude you eventually get to success.

          By just copying a set of actions (a.k.a. list of open ended questions…) your fail ratio is high and your curiosity ratio is low — which isn’t a recipe for success.

          Better questions might improve your sales 10% — maybe 50% on a great year — but caring and curiosity and an attitude of humility improve your sales 500%.  You don’t believe that.  That’s OK.

          I do.  And I suspect so do the clients all over the world that have grown there sales hundreds of percents a year after working with us on creating Edgy Conversations — by learning how to give more, love more, and be less selfish.  For them, their truth, their fact, is in the bank.

  14. Randall Wallace, the author of Braveheart, replied to his
    critics about the gross historical inaccuracy of his Fictional Film Character “Why
    let facts get in the way of a good story?”

    Did you go to the same school of journalism as Randall?

    The FACT is evidence can be produced which shows clearly the
    link between question type (and quality) and Sales Success.  i.e. both the content and the process of the questioning
    determine your sales success.

    The research which showed that there is NO difference
    between OPEN or CLOSED questions in sales success was published 25 years
    ago.  Anyone still believing Open/Closed
    or actually practicing Open/Closed still believes in the Tooth Fairy and that
    William Wallace painted his face (we stopped face painting in Scotland some 700
    years before Wallace, William that is and 1500 years before Randall)

    “To be humble yet confident” is an inane comment, unworthy
    of any thinking person talking with authority on Sales and Professional
    Selling.  It is more appropriate when
    advising unemployed people on their approach to Social Security and free
    Medi-care.

    Selling is a Profession. 
    Selling Skills are founded on Questioning techniques, which uncover not “Pain
    Points” but Customer Needs.  Sales
    Questioning, allows me, as an equal, to construct with my Customer a Value Proposition
    based on their needs and fulfilled by my Product or Service.  The outcome is Value generation for my Customer
    and just recompense for my Service.

    “Humble yet confident”, be damned! 

    Salespeople should be Competent and Effective for both their
    Customers and their Company.

    Next time do a little research; don’t just tell a good story
    or give an opinion!

    1. While your personal attacks are a smidge distracting, let me address the issues that you raise.  
      Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.  Doing just about anything better leads to being more successful.  But the analogies become silly pretty quickly.  You can become efficient at things that don’t really matter.  

      (e.g. How often are you now using those great ping pong skills from college?  At one time those skills were something that determined success…)

      Whether you are the master of open questions or stick with the closed, boring questions your sales effectiveness goes little beyond the degree to which your prospects think you care about them. The format you use matters somewhat.  That much is true.  

      But mastering interrogation techniques doesn’t mean that you position yourself to capture large business deals.  

      And while you decry humility, ego is one of the biggest self-limiting behaviors that sales people exhibit.  Instead of listening to what prospects are saying and caring about the success of the customer, sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just care more.

      Call it stupid.  Call it irrelevant. That still does not change the fact that care and humility trump tactics.  Every time.  

      The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience.  But they aren’t alone.  So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.

      These companies make a great story.  Each of them.  And that’s not my opinion.

      1. Let’s go back to your opinions, again. In your opinion “The true impact of asking better questions is minimal on increased deals.”  Well your opinion is wrong.  The evidence can be read in SPIN Selling published in 1987, and their study can be repeated by anyone who wishes to use a FACT, instead of an opinion.

         

        Nobody, who has done any research into “Open” and “Closed”
        questions prefers one type over the other. It simply is not a FACT that open
        questions get “more” information or “quality” than closed questions.

        Is your comment: “Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.”  Not simply completely at odds with your own article?

        Ping –Pong at college is an equivocation.

        Any “interrogation” is an absence of Selling Skills, further
        equivocation on your part.

        “Humility”, worse still “feigned Humility” has nothing to do with Professional Selling, no matter how often you express your opinion that it does.

        “Listening” is a fundamental part of the Sales Skill of Questioning,
        if you listen without questioning you are a Radio Audience, not a Salesperson.

        “Sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just caremore.” 

        If that was true Health care workers would be top of the sales tree, it’s simply a foolish false argument.  Which you have no evidence for, and you would
        find it difficult maybe impossible even to gain widespread agreement as to how “CARING” is defined.

        As for you master argument, your research, …….please!

        “The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience. But they aren’t alone. So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.”

        Amazon doesn’t care, it succeeds by removing obstacles to buying!  Southwestern (like Easyjet and Ryanair) succeeds on price.  Costco, which in
        Europe is a B2B seller, simply confuses the buyer into buying too much as it
        appears cheaper in bulk.  The common factor is not humility, or caring but simply better “offers”.  And, with little “selling” involved.

        Try Humble and Caring in B2B Customers : in IT, Big Software, Big Data, or Big Telco.  
        Leave humble where it belongs with Uriah Heep in Dickensian England.

        Salespeople, professionals need to learn how to use “Sales Questioning
        Skills”, and a whole range of Interactive Skills.  Sales Competence is having a Range of Interactive Skills to choose from and Choosing the most appropriate for the Customer Situation.

        1. Your brilliant cynicism is blinding you, @twitter-19037388:disqus , to the intention and tone of this article — and my blog overall.  

          Actions will never take you as far as attitudes.  You can call that my opinion.  That still doesn’t change that it is truth.  According to your logic, just because Neil Rackham wrote it down in a book, it must be truth.  

          So, we both have our belief systems.  And since I have generated tens of millions of dollars for myself being humble and kind — selling to IT, selling to attorneys, selling to CEO’s all over the world — I will continue to do so and decry anything else as incomparable.  

          And as for your belief that only a logical 7-step process for asking and answering questions is the best way to increase sells I ask you: “How small is that vision?”  

          Instead of improving on mediocrity, why not throw it out altogether and teach people how to think on their own?  The right attitudes and intentions always lead to the best actions and outcomes.  No one get’s it right the first time, but as long as you have the right attitude you eventually get to success.

          By just copying a set of actions (a.k.a. list of open ended questions…) your fail ratio is high and your curiosity ratio is low — which isn’t a recipe for success.

          Better questions might improve your sales 10% — maybe 50% on a great year — but caring and curiosity and an attitude of humility improve your sales 500%.  You don’t believe that.  That’s OK.

          I do.  And I suspect so do the clients all over the world that have grown there sales hundreds of percents a year after working with us on creating Edgy Conversations — by learning how to give more, love more, and be less selfish.  For them, their truth, their fact, is in the bank.

  15. Randall Wallace, the author of Braveheart, replied to his
    critics about the gross historical inaccuracy of his Fictional Film Character “Why
    let facts get in the way of a good story?”

    Did you go to the same school of journalism as Randall?

    The FACT is evidence can be produced which shows clearly the
    link between question type (and quality) and Sales Success.  i.e. both the content and the process of the questioning
    determine your sales success.

    The research which showed that there is NO difference
    between OPEN or CLOSED questions in sales success was published 25 years
    ago.  Anyone still believing Open/Closed
    or actually practicing Open/Closed still believes in the Tooth Fairy and that
    William Wallace painted his face (we stopped face painting in Scotland some 700
    years before Wallace, William that is and 1500 years before Randall)

    “To be humble yet confident” is an inane comment, unworthy
    of any thinking person talking with authority on Sales and Professional
    Selling.  It is more appropriate when
    advising unemployed people on their approach to Social Security and free
    Medi-care.

    Selling is a Profession. 
    Selling Skills are founded on Questioning techniques, which uncover not “Pain
    Points” but Customer Needs.  Sales
    Questioning, allows me, as an equal, to construct with my Customer a Value Proposition
    based on their needs and fulfilled by my Product or Service.  The outcome is Value generation for my Customer
    and just recompense for my Service.

    “Humble yet confident”, be damned! 

    Salespeople should be Competent and Effective for both their
    Customers and their Company.

    Next time do a little research; don’t just tell a good story
    or give an opinion!

    1. While your personal attacks are a smidge distracting, let me address the issues that you raise.  
      Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.  Doing just about anything better leads to being more successful.  But the analogies become silly pretty quickly.  You can become efficient at things that don’t really matter.  

      (e.g. How often are you now using those great ping pong skills from college?  At one time those skills were something that determined success…)

      Whether you are the master of open questions or stick with the closed, boring questions your sales effectiveness goes little beyond the degree to which your prospects think you care about them. The format you use matters somewhat.  That much is true.  

      But mastering interrogation techniques doesn’t mean that you position yourself to capture large business deals.  

      And while you decry humility, ego is one of the biggest self-limiting behaviors that sales people exhibit.  Instead of listening to what prospects are saying and caring about the success of the customer, sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just care more.

      Call it stupid.  Call it irrelevant. That still does not change the fact that care and humility trump tactics.  Every time.  

      The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience.  But they aren’t alone.  So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.

      These companies make a great story.  Each of them.  And that’s not my opinion.

      1. Let’s go back to your opinions, again. In your opinion “The true impact of asking better questions is minimal on increased deals.”  Well your opinion is wrong.  The evidence can be read in SPIN Selling published in 1987, and their study can be repeated by anyone who wishes to use a FACT, instead of an opinion.

         

        Nobody, who has done any research into “Open” and “Closed”
        questions prefers one type over the other. It simply is not a FACT that open
        questions get “more” information or “quality” than closed questions.

        Is your comment: “Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.”  Not simply completely at odds with your own article?

        Ping –Pong at college is an equivocation.

        Any “interrogation” is an absence of Selling Skills, further
        equivocation on your part.

        “Humility”, worse still “feigned Humility” has nothing to do with Professional Selling, no matter how often you express your opinion that it does.

        “Listening” is a fundamental part of the Sales Skill of Questioning,
        if you listen without questioning you are a Radio Audience, not a Salesperson.

        “Sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just caremore.” 

        If that was true Health care workers would be top of the sales tree, it’s simply a foolish false argument.  Which you have no evidence for, and you would
        find it difficult maybe impossible even to gain widespread agreement as to how “CARING” is defined.

        As for you master argument, your research, …….please!

        “The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience. But they aren’t alone. So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.”

        Amazon doesn’t care, it succeeds by removing obstacles to buying!  Southwestern (like Easyjet and Ryanair) succeeds on price.  Costco, which in
        Europe is a B2B seller, simply confuses the buyer into buying too much as it
        appears cheaper in bulk.  The common factor is not humility, or caring but simply better “offers”.  And, with little “selling” involved.

        Try Humble and Caring in B2B Customers : in IT, Big Software, Big Data, or Big Telco.  
        Leave humble where it belongs with Uriah Heep in Dickensian England.

        Salespeople, professionals need to learn how to use “Sales Questioning
        Skills”, and a whole range of Interactive Skills.  Sales Competence is having a Range of Interactive Skills to choose from and Choosing the most appropriate for the Customer Situation.

        1. Your brilliant cynicism is blinding you, @twitter-19037388:disqus , to the intention and tone of this article — and my blog overall.  

          Actions will never take you as far as attitudes.  You can call that my opinion.  That still doesn’t change that it is truth.  According to your logic, just because Neil Rackham wrote it down in a book, it must be truth.  

          So, we both have our belief systems.  And since I have generated tens of millions of dollars for myself being humble and kind — selling to IT, selling to attorneys, selling to CEO’s all over the world — I will continue to do so and decry anything else as incomparable.  

          And as for your belief that only a logical 7-step process for asking and answering questions is the best way to increase sells I ask you: “How small is that vision?”  

          Instead of improving on mediocrity, why not throw it out altogether and teach people how to think on their own?  The right attitudes and intentions always lead to the best actions and outcomes.  No one get’s it right the first time, but as long as you have the right attitude you eventually get to success.

          By just copying a set of actions (a.k.a. list of open ended questions…) your fail ratio is high and your curiosity ratio is low — which isn’t a recipe for success.

          Better questions might improve your sales 10% — maybe 50% on a great year — but caring and curiosity and an attitude of humility improve your sales 500%.  You don’t believe that.  That’s OK.

          I do.  And I suspect so do the clients all over the world that have grown there sales hundreds of percents a year after working with us on creating Edgy Conversations — by learning how to give more, love more, and be less selfish.  For them, their truth, their fact, is in the bank.

  16. Randall Wallace, the author of Braveheart, replied to his
    critics about the gross historical inaccuracy of his Fictional Film Character “Why
    let facts get in the way of a good story?”

    Did you go to the same school of journalism as Randall?

    The FACT is evidence can be produced which shows clearly the
    link between question type (and quality) and Sales Success.  i.e. both the content and the process of the questioning
    determine your sales success.

    The research which showed that there is NO difference
    between OPEN or CLOSED questions in sales success was published 25 years
    ago.  Anyone still believing Open/Closed
    or actually practicing Open/Closed still believes in the Tooth Fairy and that
    William Wallace painted his face (we stopped face painting in Scotland some 700
    years before Wallace, William that is and 1500 years before Randall)

    “To be humble yet confident” is an inane comment, unworthy
    of any thinking person talking with authority on Sales and Professional
    Selling.  It is more appropriate when
    advising unemployed people on their approach to Social Security and free
    Medi-care.

    Selling is a Profession. 
    Selling Skills are founded on Questioning techniques, which uncover not “Pain
    Points” but Customer Needs.  Sales
    Questioning, allows me, as an equal, to construct with my Customer a Value Proposition
    based on their needs and fulfilled by my Product or Service.  The outcome is Value generation for my Customer
    and just recompense for my Service.

    “Humble yet confident”, be damned! 

    Salespeople should be Competent and Effective for both their
    Customers and their Company.

    Next time do a little research; don’t just tell a good story
    or give an opinion!

    1. While your personal attacks are a smidge distracting, let me address the issues that you raise.  
      Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.  Doing just about anything better leads to being more successful.  But the analogies become silly pretty quickly.  You can become efficient at things that don’t really matter.  

      (e.g. How often are you now using those great ping pong skills from college?  At one time those skills were something that determined success…)

      Whether you are the master of open questions or stick with the closed, boring questions your sales effectiveness goes little beyond the degree to which your prospects think you care about them. The format you use matters somewhat.  That much is true.  

      But mastering interrogation techniques doesn’t mean that you position yourself to capture large business deals.  

      And while you decry humility, ego is one of the biggest self-limiting behaviors that sales people exhibit.  Instead of listening to what prospects are saying and caring about the success of the customer, sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just care more.

      Call it stupid.  Call it irrelevant. That still does not change the fact that care and humility trump tactics.  Every time.  

      The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience.  But they aren’t alone.  So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.

      These companies make a great story.  Each of them.  And that’s not my opinion.

      1. Let’s go back to your opinions, again. In your opinion “The true impact of asking better questions is minimal on increased deals.”  Well your opinion is wrong.  The evidence can be read in SPIN Selling published in 1987, and their study can be repeated by anyone who wishes to use a FACT, instead of an opinion.

         

        Nobody, who has done any research into “Open” and “Closed”
        questions prefers one type over the other. It simply is not a FACT that open
        questions get “more” information or “quality” than closed questions.

        Is your comment: “Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.”  Not simply completely at odds with your own article?

        Ping –Pong at college is an equivocation.

        Any “interrogation” is an absence of Selling Skills, further
        equivocation on your part.

        “Humility”, worse still “feigned Humility” has nothing to do with Professional Selling, no matter how often you express your opinion that it does.

        “Listening” is a fundamental part of the Sales Skill of Questioning,
        if you listen without questioning you are a Radio Audience, not a Salesperson.

        “Sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just caremore.” 

        If that was true Health care workers would be top of the sales tree, it’s simply a foolish false argument.  Which you have no evidence for, and you would
        find it difficult maybe impossible even to gain widespread agreement as to how “CARING” is defined.

        As for you master argument, your research, …….please!

        “The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience. But they aren’t alone. So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.”

        Amazon doesn’t care, it succeeds by removing obstacles to buying!  Southwestern (like Easyjet and Ryanair) succeeds on price.  Costco, which in
        Europe is a B2B seller, simply confuses the buyer into buying too much as it
        appears cheaper in bulk.  The common factor is not humility, or caring but simply better “offers”.  And, with little “selling” involved.

        Try Humble and Caring in B2B Customers : in IT, Big Software, Big Data, or Big Telco.  
        Leave humble where it belongs with Uriah Heep in Dickensian England.

        Salespeople, professionals need to learn how to use “Sales Questioning
        Skills”, and a whole range of Interactive Skills.  Sales Competence is having a Range of Interactive Skills to choose from and Choosing the most appropriate for the Customer Situation.

        1. Your brilliant cynicism is blinding you, @twitter-19037388:disqus , to the intention and tone of this article — and my blog overall.  

          Actions will never take you as far as attitudes.  You can call that my opinion.  That still doesn’t change that it is truth.  According to your logic, just because Neil Rackham wrote it down in a book, it must be truth.  

          So, we both have our belief systems.  And since I have generated tens of millions of dollars for myself being humble and kind — selling to IT, selling to attorneys, selling to CEO’s all over the world — I will continue to do so and decry anything else as incomparable.  

          And as for your belief that only a logical 7-step process for asking and answering questions is the best way to increase sells I ask you: “How small is that vision?”  

          Instead of improving on mediocrity, why not throw it out altogether and teach people how to think on their own?  The right attitudes and intentions always lead to the best actions and outcomes.  No one get’s it right the first time, but as long as you have the right attitude you eventually get to success.

          By just copying a set of actions (a.k.a. list of open ended questions…) your fail ratio is high and your curiosity ratio is low — which isn’t a recipe for success.

          Better questions might improve your sales 10% — maybe 50% on a great year — but caring and curiosity and an attitude of humility improve your sales 500%.  You don’t believe that.  That’s OK.

          I do.  And I suspect so do the clients all over the world that have grown there sales hundreds of percents a year after working with us on creating Edgy Conversations — by learning how to give more, love more, and be less selfish.  For them, their truth, their fact, is in the bank.

  17. Randall Wallace, the author of Braveheart, replied to his
    critics about the gross historical inaccuracy of his Fictional Film Character “Why
    let facts get in the way of a good story?”

    Did you go to the same school of journalism as Randall?

    The FACT is evidence can be produced which shows clearly the
    link between question type (and quality) and Sales Success.  i.e. both the content and the process of the questioning
    determine your sales success.

    The research which showed that there is NO difference
    between OPEN or CLOSED questions in sales success was published 25 years
    ago.  Anyone still believing Open/Closed
    or actually practicing Open/Closed still believes in the Tooth Fairy and that
    William Wallace painted his face (we stopped face painting in Scotland some 700
    years before Wallace, William that is and 1500 years before Randall)

    “To be humble yet confident” is an inane comment, unworthy
    of any thinking person talking with authority on Sales and Professional
    Selling.  It is more appropriate when
    advising unemployed people on their approach to Social Security and free
    Medi-care.

    Selling is a Profession. 
    Selling Skills are founded on Questioning techniques, which uncover not “Pain
    Points” but Customer Needs.  Sales
    Questioning, allows me, as an equal, to construct with my Customer a Value Proposition
    based on their needs and fulfilled by my Product or Service.  The outcome is Value generation for my Customer
    and just recompense for my Service.

    “Humble yet confident”, be damned! 

    Salespeople should be Competent and Effective for both their
    Customers and their Company.

    Next time do a little research; don’t just tell a good story
    or give an opinion!

    1. While your personal attacks are a smidge distracting, let me address the issues that you raise.  
      Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.  Doing just about anything better leads to being more successful.  But the analogies become silly pretty quickly.  You can become efficient at things that don’t really matter.  

      (e.g. How often are you now using those great ping pong skills from college?  At one time those skills were something that determined success…)

      Whether you are the master of open questions or stick with the closed, boring questions your sales effectiveness goes little beyond the degree to which your prospects think you care about them. The format you use matters somewhat.  That much is true.  

      But mastering interrogation techniques doesn’t mean that you position yourself to capture large business deals.  

      And while you decry humility, ego is one of the biggest self-limiting behaviors that sales people exhibit.  Instead of listening to what prospects are saying and caring about the success of the customer, sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just care more.

      Call it stupid.  Call it irrelevant. That still does not change the fact that care and humility trump tactics.  Every time.  

      The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience.  But they aren’t alone.  So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.

      These companies make a great story.  Each of them.  And that’s not my opinion.

      1. Let’s go back to your opinions, again. In your opinion “The true impact of asking better questions is minimal on increased deals.”  Well your opinion is wrong.  The evidence can be read in SPIN Selling published in 1987, and their study can be repeated by anyone who wishes to use a FACT, instead of an opinion.

         

        Nobody, who has done any research into “Open” and “Closed”
        questions prefers one type over the other. It simply is not a FACT that open
        questions get “more” information or “quality” than closed questions.

        Is your comment: “Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.”  Not simply completely at odds with your own article?

        Ping –Pong at college is an equivocation.

        Any “interrogation” is an absence of Selling Skills, further
        equivocation on your part.

        “Humility”, worse still “feigned Humility” has nothing to do with Professional Selling, no matter how often you express your opinion that it does.

        “Listening” is a fundamental part of the Sales Skill of Questioning,
        if you listen without questioning you are a Radio Audience, not a Salesperson.

        “Sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just caremore.” 

        If that was true Health care workers would be top of the sales tree, it’s simply a foolish false argument.  Which you have no evidence for, and you would
        find it difficult maybe impossible even to gain widespread agreement as to how “CARING” is defined.

        As for you master argument, your research, …….please!

        “The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience. But they aren’t alone. So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.”

        Amazon doesn’t care, it succeeds by removing obstacles to buying!  Southwestern (like Easyjet and Ryanair) succeeds on price.  Costco, which in
        Europe is a B2B seller, simply confuses the buyer into buying too much as it
        appears cheaper in bulk.  The common factor is not humility, or caring but simply better “offers”.  And, with little “selling” involved.

        Try Humble and Caring in B2B Customers : in IT, Big Software, Big Data, or Big Telco.  
        Leave humble where it belongs with Uriah Heep in Dickensian England.

        Salespeople, professionals need to learn how to use “Sales Questioning
        Skills”, and a whole range of Interactive Skills.  Sales Competence is having a Range of Interactive Skills to choose from and Choosing the most appropriate for the Customer Situation.

        1. Your brilliant cynicism is blinding you, @twitter-19037388:disqus , to the intention and tone of this article — and my blog overall.  

          Actions will never take you as far as attitudes.  You can call that my opinion.  That still doesn’t change that it is truth.  According to your logic, just because Neil Rackham wrote it down in a book, it must be truth.  

          So, we both have our belief systems.  And since I have generated tens of millions of dollars for myself being humble and kind — selling to IT, selling to attorneys, selling to CEO’s all over the world — I will continue to do so and decry anything else as incomparable.  

          And as for your belief that only a logical 7-step process for asking and answering questions is the best way to increase sells I ask you: “How small is that vision?”  

          Instead of improving on mediocrity, why not throw it out altogether and teach people how to think on their own?  The right attitudes and intentions always lead to the best actions and outcomes.  No one get’s it right the first time, but as long as you have the right attitude you eventually get to success.

          By just copying a set of actions (a.k.a. list of open ended questions…) your fail ratio is high and your curiosity ratio is low — which isn’t a recipe for success.

          Better questions might improve your sales 10% — maybe 50% on a great year — but caring and curiosity and an attitude of humility improve your sales 500%.  You don’t believe that.  That’s OK.

          I do.  And I suspect so do the clients all over the world that have grown there sales hundreds of percents a year after working with us on creating Edgy Conversations — by learning how to give more, love more, and be less selfish.  For them, their truth, their fact, is in the bank.

  18. Randall Wallace, the author of Braveheart, replied to his
    critics about the gross historical inaccuracy of his Fictional Film Character “Why
    let facts get in the way of a good story?”

    Did you go to the same school of journalism as Randall?

    The FACT is evidence can be produced which shows clearly the
    link between question type (and quality) and Sales Success.  i.e. both the content and the process of the questioning
    determine your sales success.

    The research which showed that there is NO difference
    between OPEN or CLOSED questions in sales success was published 25 years
    ago.  Anyone still believing Open/Closed
    or actually practicing Open/Closed still believes in the Tooth Fairy and that
    William Wallace painted his face (we stopped face painting in Scotland some 700
    years before Wallace, William that is and 1500 years before Randall)

    “To be humble yet confident” is an inane comment, unworthy
    of any thinking person talking with authority on Sales and Professional
    Selling.  It is more appropriate when
    advising unemployed people on their approach to Social Security and free
    Medi-care.

    Selling is a Profession. 
    Selling Skills are founded on Questioning techniques, which uncover not “Pain
    Points” but Customer Needs.  Sales
    Questioning, allows me, as an equal, to construct with my Customer a Value Proposition
    based on their needs and fulfilled by my Product or Service.  The outcome is Value generation for my Customer
    and just recompense for my Service.

    “Humble yet confident”, be damned! 

    Salespeople should be Competent and Effective for both their
    Customers and their Company.

    Next time do a little research; don’t just tell a good story
    or give an opinion!

    1. While your personal attacks are a smidge distracting, let me address the issues that you raise.  
      Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.  Doing just about anything better leads to being more successful.  But the analogies become silly pretty quickly.  You can become efficient at things that don’t really matter.  

      (e.g. How often are you now using those great ping pong skills from college?  At one time those skills were something that determined success…)

      Whether you are the master of open questions or stick with the closed, boring questions your sales effectiveness goes little beyond the degree to which your prospects think you care about them. The format you use matters somewhat.  That much is true.  

      But mastering interrogation techniques doesn’t mean that you position yourself to capture large business deals.  

      And while you decry humility, ego is one of the biggest self-limiting behaviors that sales people exhibit.  Instead of listening to what prospects are saying and caring about the success of the customer, sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just care more.

      Call it stupid.  Call it irrelevant. That still does not change the fact that care and humility trump tactics.  Every time.  

      The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience.  But they aren’t alone.  So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.

      These companies make a great story.  Each of them.  And that’s not my opinion.

      1. Let’s go back to your opinions, again. In your opinion “The true impact of asking better questions is minimal on increased deals.”  Well your opinion is wrong.  The evidence can be read in SPIN Selling published in 1987, and their study can be repeated by anyone who wishes to use a FACT, instead of an opinion.

         

        Nobody, who has done any research into “Open” and “Closed”
        questions prefers one type over the other. It simply is not a FACT that open
        questions get “more” information or “quality” than closed questions.

        Is your comment: “Of course there is a link between asking better questions and being more successful.”  Not simply completely at odds with your own article?

        Ping –Pong at college is an equivocation.

        Any “interrogation” is an absence of Selling Skills, further
        equivocation on your part.

        “Humility”, worse still “feigned Humility” has nothing to do with Professional Selling, no matter how often you express your opinion that it does.

        “Listening” is a fundamental part of the Sales Skill of Questioning,
        if you listen without questioning you are a Radio Audience, not a Salesperson.

        “Sales people focused on better questioning LOSE consistently to sales people who just caremore.” 

        If that was true Health care workers would be top of the sales tree, it’s simply a foolish false argument.  Which you have no evidence for, and you would
        find it difficult maybe impossible even to gain widespread agreement as to how “CARING” is defined.

        As for you master argument, your research, …….please!

        “The research backs that up. We know that Zappos built a billion dollar company by focusing on providing an amazing customer service experience. But they aren’t alone. So did Nordstroms, Whole Foods, Build-A-Bear, UPS, Costco, Southwest Airlines, Publix, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon.com.”

        Amazon doesn’t care, it succeeds by removing obstacles to buying!  Southwestern (like Easyjet and Ryanair) succeeds on price.  Costco, which in
        Europe is a B2B seller, simply confuses the buyer into buying too much as it
        appears cheaper in bulk.  The common factor is not humility, or caring but simply better “offers”.  And, with little “selling” involved.

        Try Humble and Caring in B2B Customers : in IT, Big Software, Big Data, or Big Telco.  
        Leave humble where it belongs with Uriah Heep in Dickensian England.

        Salespeople, professionals need to learn how to use “Sales Questioning
        Skills”, and a whole range of Interactive Skills.  Sales Competence is having a Range of Interactive Skills to choose from and Choosing the most appropriate for the Customer Situation.

        1. Your brilliant cynicism is blinding you, @twitter-19037388:disqus , to the intention and tone of this article — and my blog overall.  

          Actions will never take you as far as attitudes.  You can call that my opinion.  That still doesn’t change that it is truth.  According to your logic, just because Neil Rackham wrote it down in a book, it must be truth.  

          So, we both have our belief systems.  And since I have generated tens of millions of dollars for myself being humble and kind — selling to IT, selling to attorneys, selling to CEO’s all over the world — I will continue to do so and decry anything else as incomparable.  

          And as for your belief that only a logical 7-step process for asking and answering questions is the best way to increase sells I ask you: “How small is that vision?”  

          Instead of improving on mediocrity, why not throw it out altogether and teach people how to think on their own?  The right attitudes and intentions always lead to the best actions and outcomes.  No one get’s it right the first time, but as long as you have the right attitude you eventually get to success.

          By just copying a set of actions (a.k.a. list of open ended questions…) your fail ratio is high and your curiosity ratio is low — which isn’t a recipe for success.

          Better questions might improve your sales 10% — maybe 50% on a great year — but caring and curiosity and an attitude of humility improve your sales 500%.  You don’t believe that.  That’s OK.

          I do.  And I suspect so do the clients all over the world that have grown there sales hundreds of percents a year after working with us on creating Edgy Conversations — by learning how to give more, love more, and be less selfish.  For them, their truth, their fact, is in the bank.

  19. Care or Questions?

    Here is how I would equivocate:

    “In order for a Doctor to be a good diagnostician (think “House”)
    – they need a LARGE set of labels for diseases. 
    The Labels bind together a large set of Symptoms and Causes;
    developments and consequences as well as cures, treatments and
    interventions.  The expected outcome is a
    cure, or at least mitigation.  All of
    this depends on a RICH vocabulary which goes far beyond everyday language, and
    is skill and evidence based”

    Give me “House”, with his arrogance, his indifference and
    bad manners but his COMPETENCE for my survival. 
    You can have the humble, silent, listener and pass away from unknown
    causes, but have the consolation of knowing that they cared!

    But, as I don’t equivocate I admit that selling and medical
    diagnostics are different, not the same! 
    Yet, with evidence I can see, that better Salespeople like better
    Doctors ask better questions, have more knowledge about their patient or Buyers
    situation and can offer more appropriate cures or Solutions.  Neither Profession is humility nor caring
    based.  Both are based on Competence and
    Behaviours.  Customer “Care” belongs in
    Customer Service not Sales.

    1. I like your analogy of medicine, @twitter-19037388:disqus .  I use it often when speaking to clients.  There is a direct correlation between how much money you can charge and how much you “heal”.  
      (Yes, again back to the idea of empathy, kindness, and caring…)

      Think with me of those job types:  surgeons, doctors, engineers, lawyers.  They all heal people’s pain.  The best in each of these professions isn’t cocky or even good at going through a list of questions.  They listen and care and our curious.  And the combinations drives their behavior.  

      Medical school doesn’t teach doctors how to ask better questions.  They teach doctors about pain and how to spot it, decode it, and eliminate it.  It’s all about pain — not the examination interview.

      That’s we’ve done wrong in business.  We focused on the wrong priorities.  

      We’re handing out bandaids to HIV patients. All the while defending that they need something to “cover their sores”.  Which might be somewhat true, but is appalling in totality.  What works?  Figuring out how to fight what is going on in the inside.  That’s how you beat HIV.  You fix the inside.

      And that’s what you need to do to fix revenue problems.  Will better questions be better — oh sure.  But how much? 

      Why keep patching a wound when you can cure a sickness?

      Dan

       

  20. Care or Questions?

    Here is how I would equivocate:

    “In order for a Doctor to be a good diagnostician (think “House”)
    – they need a LARGE set of labels for diseases. 
    The Labels bind together a large set of Symptoms and Causes;
    developments and consequences as well as cures, treatments and
    interventions.  The expected outcome is a
    cure, or at least mitigation.  All of
    this depends on a RICH vocabulary which goes far beyond everyday language, and
    is skill and evidence based”

    Give me “House”, with his arrogance, his indifference and
    bad manners but his COMPETENCE for my survival. 
    You can have the humble, silent, listener and pass away from unknown
    causes, but have the consolation of knowing that they cared!

    But, as I don’t equivocate I admit that selling and medical
    diagnostics are different, not the same! 
    Yet, with evidence I can see, that better Salespeople like better
    Doctors ask better questions, have more knowledge about their patient or Buyers
    situation and can offer more appropriate cures or Solutions.  Neither Profession is humility nor caring
    based.  Both are based on Competence and
    Behaviours.  Customer “Care” belongs in
    Customer Service not Sales.

    1. I like your analogy of medicine, @twitter-19037388:disqus .  I use it often when speaking to clients.  There is a direct correlation between how much money you can charge and how much you “heal”.  
      (Yes, again back to the idea of empathy, kindness, and caring…)

      Think with me of those job types:  surgeons, doctors, engineers, lawyers.  They all heal people’s pain.  The best in each of these professions isn’t cocky or even good at going through a list of questions.  They listen and care and our curious.  And the combinations drives their behavior.  

      Medical school doesn’t teach doctors how to ask better questions.  They teach doctors about pain and how to spot it, decode it, and eliminate it.  It’s all about pain — not the examination interview.

      That’s we’ve done wrong in business.  We focused on the wrong priorities.  

      We’re handing out bandaids to HIV patients. All the while defending that they need something to “cover their sores”.  Which might be somewhat true, but is appalling in totality.  What works?  Figuring out how to fight what is going on in the inside.  That’s how you beat HIV.  You fix the inside.

      And that’s what you need to do to fix revenue problems.  Will better questions be better — oh sure.  But how much? 

      Why keep patching a wound when you can cure a sickness?

      Dan

       

  21. Care or Questions?

    Here is how I would equivocate:

    “In order for a Doctor to be a good diagnostician (think “House”)
    – they need a LARGE set of labels for diseases. 
    The Labels bind together a large set of Symptoms and Causes;
    developments and consequences as well as cures, treatments and
    interventions.  The expected outcome is a
    cure, or at least mitigation.  All of
    this depends on a RICH vocabulary which goes far beyond everyday language, and
    is skill and evidence based”

    Give me “House”, with his arrogance, his indifference and
    bad manners but his COMPETENCE for my survival. 
    You can have the humble, silent, listener and pass away from unknown
    causes, but have the consolation of knowing that they cared!

    But, as I don’t equivocate I admit that selling and medical
    diagnostics are different, not the same! 
    Yet, with evidence I can see, that better Salespeople like better
    Doctors ask better questions, have more knowledge about their patient or Buyers
    situation and can offer more appropriate cures or Solutions.  Neither Profession is humility nor caring
    based.  Both are based on Competence and
    Behaviours.  Customer “Care” belongs in
    Customer Service not Sales.

    1. I like your analogy of medicine, @twitter-19037388:disqus .  I use it often when speaking to clients.  There is a direct correlation between how much money you can charge and how much you “heal”.  
      (Yes, again back to the idea of empathy, kindness, and caring…)

      Think with me of those job types:  surgeons, doctors, engineers, lawyers.  They all heal people’s pain.  The best in each of these professions isn’t cocky or even good at going through a list of questions.  They listen and care and our curious.  And the combinations drives their behavior.  

      Medical school doesn’t teach doctors how to ask better questions.  They teach doctors about pain and how to spot it, decode it, and eliminate it.  It’s all about pain — not the examination interview.

      That’s we’ve done wrong in business.  We focused on the wrong priorities.  

      We’re handing out bandaids to HIV patients. All the while defending that they need something to “cover their sores”.  Which might be somewhat true, but is appalling in totality.  What works?  Figuring out how to fight what is going on in the inside.  That’s how you beat HIV.  You fix the inside.

      And that’s what you need to do to fix revenue problems.  Will better questions be better — oh sure.  But how much? 

      Why keep patching a wound when you can cure a sickness?

      Dan

       

  22. Care or Questions?

    Here is how I would equivocate:

    “In order for a Doctor to be a good diagnostician (think “House”)
    – they need a LARGE set of labels for diseases. 
    The Labels bind together a large set of Symptoms and Causes;
    developments and consequences as well as cures, treatments and
    interventions.  The expected outcome is a
    cure, or at least mitigation.  All of
    this depends on a RICH vocabulary which goes far beyond everyday language, and
    is skill and evidence based”

    Give me “House”, with his arrogance, his indifference and
    bad manners but his COMPETENCE for my survival. 
    You can have the humble, silent, listener and pass away from unknown
    causes, but have the consolation of knowing that they cared!

    But, as I don’t equivocate I admit that selling and medical
    diagnostics are different, not the same! 
    Yet, with evidence I can see, that better Salespeople like better
    Doctors ask better questions, have more knowledge about their patient or Buyers
    situation and can offer more appropriate cures or Solutions.  Neither Profession is humility nor caring
    based.  Both are based on Competence and
    Behaviours.  Customer “Care” belongs in
    Customer Service not Sales.

    1. I like your analogy of medicine, @twitter-19037388:disqus .  I use it often when speaking to clients.  There is a direct correlation between how much money you can charge and how much you “heal”.  
      (Yes, again back to the idea of empathy, kindness, and caring…)

      Think with me of those job types:  surgeons, doctors, engineers, lawyers.  They all heal people’s pain.  The best in each of these professions isn’t cocky or even good at going through a list of questions.  They listen and care and our curious.  And the combinations drives their behavior.  

      Medical school doesn’t teach doctors how to ask better questions.  They teach doctors about pain and how to spot it, decode it, and eliminate it.  It’s all about pain — not the examination interview.

      That’s we’ve done wrong in business.  We focused on the wrong priorities.  

      We’re handing out bandaids to HIV patients. All the while defending that they need something to “cover their sores”.  Which might be somewhat true, but is appalling in totality.  What works?  Figuring out how to fight what is going on in the inside.  That’s how you beat HIV.  You fix the inside.

      And that’s what you need to do to fix revenue problems.  Will better questions be better — oh sure.  But how much? 

      Why keep patching a wound when you can cure a sickness?

      Dan

       

  23. Care or Questions?

    Here is how I would equivocate:

    “In order for a Doctor to be a good diagnostician (think “House”)
    – they need a LARGE set of labels for diseases. 
    The Labels bind together a large set of Symptoms and Causes;
    developments and consequences as well as cures, treatments and
    interventions.  The expected outcome is a
    cure, or at least mitigation.  All of
    this depends on a RICH vocabulary which goes far beyond everyday language, and
    is skill and evidence based”

    Give me “House”, with his arrogance, his indifference and
    bad manners but his COMPETENCE for my survival. 
    You can have the humble, silent, listener and pass away from unknown
    causes, but have the consolation of knowing that they cared!

    But, as I don’t equivocate I admit that selling and medical
    diagnostics are different, not the same! 
    Yet, with evidence I can see, that better Salespeople like better
    Doctors ask better questions, have more knowledge about their patient or Buyers
    situation and can offer more appropriate cures or Solutions.  Neither Profession is humility nor caring
    based.  Both are based on Competence and
    Behaviours.  Customer “Care” belongs in
    Customer Service not Sales.

    1. I like your analogy of medicine, @twitter-19037388:disqus .  I use it often when speaking to clients.  There is a direct correlation between how much money you can charge and how much you “heal”.  
      (Yes, again back to the idea of empathy, kindness, and caring…)

      Think with me of those job types:  surgeons, doctors, engineers, lawyers.  They all heal people’s pain.  The best in each of these professions isn’t cocky or even good at going through a list of questions.  They listen and care and our curious.  And the combinations drives their behavior.  

      Medical school doesn’t teach doctors how to ask better questions.  They teach doctors about pain and how to spot it, decode it, and eliminate it.  It’s all about pain — not the examination interview.

      That’s we’ve done wrong in business.  We focused on the wrong priorities.  

      We’re handing out bandaids to HIV patients. All the while defending that they need something to “cover their sores”.  Which might be somewhat true, but is appalling in totality.  What works?  Figuring out how to fight what is going on in the inside.  That’s how you beat HIV.  You fix the inside.

      And that’s what you need to do to fix revenue problems.  Will better questions be better — oh sure.  But how much? 

      Why keep patching a wound when you can cure a sickness?

      Dan

       

  24. Care or Questions?

    Here is how I would equivocate:

    “In order for a Doctor to be a good diagnostician (think “House”)
    – they need a LARGE set of labels for diseases. 
    The Labels bind together a large set of Symptoms and Causes;
    developments and consequences as well as cures, treatments and
    interventions.  The expected outcome is a
    cure, or at least mitigation.  All of
    this depends on a RICH vocabulary which goes far beyond everyday language, and
    is skill and evidence based”

    Give me “House”, with his arrogance, his indifference and
    bad manners but his COMPETENCE for my survival. 
    You can have the humble, silent, listener and pass away from unknown
    causes, but have the consolation of knowing that they cared!

    But, as I don’t equivocate I admit that selling and medical
    diagnostics are different, not the same! 
    Yet, with evidence I can see, that better Salespeople like better
    Doctors ask better questions, have more knowledge about their patient or Buyers
    situation and can offer more appropriate cures or Solutions.  Neither Profession is humility nor caring
    based.  Both are based on Competence and
    Behaviours.  Customer “Care” belongs in
    Customer Service not Sales.

    1. I like your analogy of medicine, @twitter-19037388:disqus .  I use it often when speaking to clients.  There is a direct correlation between how much money you can charge and how much you “heal”.  
      (Yes, again back to the idea of empathy, kindness, and caring…)

      Think with me of those job types:  surgeons, doctors, engineers, lawyers.  They all heal people’s pain.  The best in each of these professions isn’t cocky or even good at going through a list of questions.  They listen and care and our curious.  And the combinations drives their behavior.  

      Medical school doesn’t teach doctors how to ask better questions.  They teach doctors about pain and how to spot it, decode it, and eliminate it.  It’s all about pain — not the examination interview.

      That’s we’ve done wrong in business.  We focused on the wrong priorities.  

      We’re handing out bandaids to HIV patients. All the while defending that they need something to “cover their sores”.  Which might be somewhat true, but is appalling in totality.  What works?  Figuring out how to fight what is going on in the inside.  That’s how you beat HIV.  You fix the inside.

      And that’s what you need to do to fix revenue problems.  Will better questions be better — oh sure.  But how much? 

      Why keep patching a wound when you can cure a sickness?

      Dan

       

  25. It’s how I carry myself in every prospect I’m in contact with.  These people put their pants on the same way I do.  No one cares how much you know until they  know ho much you care.  Bravo Zulu Danny boy! 

  26. It’s how I carry myself in every prospect I’m in contact with.  These people put their pants on the same way I do.  No one cares how much you know until they  know ho much you care.  Bravo Zulu Danny boy! 

  27. It’s how I carry myself in every prospect I’m in contact with.  These people put their pants on the same way I do.  No one cares how much you know until they  know ho much you care.  Bravo Zulu Danny boy! 

  28. It’s how I carry myself in every prospect I’m in contact with.  These people put their pants on the same way I do.  No one cares how much you know until they  know ho much you care.  Bravo Zulu Danny boy! 

  29. It’s how I carry myself in every prospect I’m in contact with.  These people put their pants on the same way I do.  No one cares how much you know until they  know ho much you care.  Bravo Zulu Danny boy! 

  30. It’s how I carry myself in every prospect I’m in contact with.  These people put their pants on the same way I do.  No one cares how much you know until they  know ho much you care.  Bravo Zulu Danny boy! 

  31. Dan,
    Would you go to a surgeon who is proven to be competent, but not very caring, rather than a surgeon who is average, but very caring?  Lot of companies are in a survival mode and I don’t know they are going to go with a caring salesperson.  Your blog sounds good, but is it really practical today?  

    Caring is like relationship selling.  Don’t lead with it, lead into it through results.  

    Thoughts?

    1. I wouldn’t tolerate incompetence under any circumstances.  But caring doesn’t mean you can’t be amazing.  They aren’t mutually exclusive.  

      In fact, caring is that extra “something” that drives outrageous results.  Think about the last time you watched a sporting event and an announcer made the comment that the surprising winner “wanted it more”…  
      Caring was the difference, right?  The winner cared more about winning.  The same is exactly true about business.

      Caring doesn’t mean that you’re a namby-pamby emotional basket-case.  It just wins that all-things-being-equal you win more.  You close business.  You get the job done.  

      Because you care more, you find solutions where others only stop at problems.  You deliver more value where others stop at delivering the results that are paid for.

      It’s an attitude.  Not fewer actions couched in a church excuse  — “we’re doing this because we care”…

      Dan

  32. Dan,
    Would you go to a surgeon who is proven to be competent, but not very caring, rather than a surgeon who is average, but very caring?  Lot of companies are in a survival mode and I don’t know they are going to go with a caring salesperson.  Your blog sounds good, but is it really practical today?  

    Caring is like relationship selling.  Don’t lead with it, lead into it through results.  

    Thoughts?

    1. I wouldn’t tolerate incompetence under any circumstances.  But caring doesn’t mean you can’t be amazing.  They aren’t mutually exclusive.  

      In fact, caring is that extra “something” that drives outrageous results.  Think about the last time you watched a sporting event and an announcer made the comment that the surprising winner “wanted it more”…  
      Caring was the difference, right?  The winner cared more about winning.  The same is exactly true about business.

      Caring doesn’t mean that you’re a namby-pamby emotional basket-case.  It just wins that all-things-being-equal you win more.  You close business.  You get the job done.  

      Because you care more, you find solutions where others only stop at problems.  You deliver more value where others stop at delivering the results that are paid for.

      It’s an attitude.  Not fewer actions couched in a church excuse  — “we’re doing this because we care”…

      Dan

  33. Dan,
    Would you go to a surgeon who is proven to be competent, but not very caring, rather than a surgeon who is average, but very caring?  Lot of companies are in a survival mode and I don’t know they are going to go with a caring salesperson.  Your blog sounds good, but is it really practical today?  

    Caring is like relationship selling.  Don’t lead with it, lead into it through results.  

    Thoughts?

    1. I wouldn’t tolerate incompetence under any circumstances.  But caring doesn’t mean you can’t be amazing.  They aren’t mutually exclusive.  

      In fact, caring is that extra “something” that drives outrageous results.  Think about the last time you watched a sporting event and an announcer made the comment that the surprising winner “wanted it more”…  
      Caring was the difference, right?  The winner cared more about winning.  The same is exactly true about business.

      Caring doesn’t mean that you’re a namby-pamby emotional basket-case.  It just wins that all-things-being-equal you win more.  You close business.  You get the job done.  

      Because you care more, you find solutions where others only stop at problems.  You deliver more value where others stop at delivering the results that are paid for.

      It’s an attitude.  Not fewer actions couched in a church excuse  — “we’re doing this because we care”…

      Dan

  34. Dan,
    Would you go to a surgeon who is proven to be competent, but not very caring, rather than a surgeon who is average, but very caring?  Lot of companies are in a survival mode and I don’t know they are going to go with a caring salesperson.  Your blog sounds good, but is it really practical today?  

    Caring is like relationship selling.  Don’t lead with it, lead into it through results.  

    Thoughts?

    1. I wouldn’t tolerate incompetence under any circumstances.  But caring doesn’t mean you can’t be amazing.  They aren’t mutually exclusive.  

      In fact, caring is that extra “something” that drives outrageous results.  Think about the last time you watched a sporting event and an announcer made the comment that the surprising winner “wanted it more”…  
      Caring was the difference, right?  The winner cared more about winning.  The same is exactly true about business.

      Caring doesn’t mean that you’re a namby-pamby emotional basket-case.  It just wins that all-things-being-equal you win more.  You close business.  You get the job done.  

      Because you care more, you find solutions where others only stop at problems.  You deliver more value where others stop at delivering the results that are paid for.

      It’s an attitude.  Not fewer actions couched in a church excuse  — “we’re doing this because we care”…

      Dan

  35. Dan,
    Would you go to a surgeon who is proven to be competent, but not very caring, rather than a surgeon who is average, but very caring?  Lot of companies are in a survival mode and I don’t know they are going to go with a caring salesperson.  Your blog sounds good, but is it really practical today?  

    Caring is like relationship selling.  Don’t lead with it, lead into it through results.  

    Thoughts?

    1. I wouldn’t tolerate incompetence under any circumstances.  But caring doesn’t mean you can’t be amazing.  They aren’t mutually exclusive.  

      In fact, caring is that extra “something” that drives outrageous results.  Think about the last time you watched a sporting event and an announcer made the comment that the surprising winner “wanted it more”…  
      Caring was the difference, right?  The winner cared more about winning.  The same is exactly true about business.

      Caring doesn’t mean that you’re a namby-pamby emotional basket-case.  It just wins that all-things-being-equal you win more.  You close business.  You get the job done.  

      Because you care more, you find solutions where others only stop at problems.  You deliver more value where others stop at delivering the results that are paid for.

      It’s an attitude.  Not fewer actions couched in a church excuse  — “we’re doing this because we care”…

      Dan

  36. Dan,
    Would you go to a surgeon who is proven to be competent, but not very caring, rather than a surgeon who is average, but very caring?  Lot of companies are in a survival mode and I don’t know they are going to go with a caring salesperson.  Your blog sounds good, but is it really practical today?  

    Caring is like relationship selling.  Don’t lead with it, lead into it through results.  

    Thoughts?

    1. I wouldn’t tolerate incompetence under any circumstances.  But caring doesn’t mean you can’t be amazing.  They aren’t mutually exclusive.  

      In fact, caring is that extra “something” that drives outrageous results.  Think about the last time you watched a sporting event and an announcer made the comment that the surprising winner “wanted it more”…  
      Caring was the difference, right?  The winner cared more about winning.  The same is exactly true about business.

      Caring doesn’t mean that you’re a namby-pamby emotional basket-case.  It just wins that all-things-being-equal you win more.  You close business.  You get the job done.  

      Because you care more, you find solutions where others only stop at problems.  You deliver more value where others stop at delivering the results that are paid for.

      It’s an attitude.  Not fewer actions couched in a church excuse  — “we’re doing this because we care”…

      Dan

  37. Dan, I agree with your post on many levels. Having launched many brands large and small, I have had to work arm and arm with founders and sales people to close business with products and services that weren’t even ready for the market. Part of success was trust and a personal guarantee that we (in the marketing/sales role) would do the right thing. Often, that meant walking away from revenue when our technology wasn’t ready on time and, our actions could jeopardize the customer’s job. Many years later, I can call every one of those people and they will talk to me. I learned pretty quickly that you may think you are selling a product or service but really you’re selling your self, your word and your reputation. And you should act and converse accordingly.

  38. Dan, I agree with your post on many levels. Having launched many brands large and small, I have had to work arm and arm with founders and sales people to close business with products and services that weren’t even ready for the market. Part of success was trust and a personal guarantee that we (in the marketing/sales role) would do the right thing. Often, that meant walking away from revenue when our technology wasn’t ready on time and, our actions could jeopardize the customer’s job. Many years later, I can call every one of those people and they will talk to me. I learned pretty quickly that you may think you are selling a product or service but really you’re selling your self, your word and your reputation. And you should act and converse accordingly.

  39. Dan, I agree with your post on many levels. Having launched many brands large and small, I have had to work arm and arm with founders and sales people to close business with products and services that weren’t even ready for the market. Part of success was trust and a personal guarantee that we (in the marketing/sales role) would do the right thing. Often, that meant walking away from revenue when our technology wasn’t ready on time and, our actions could jeopardize the customer’s job. Many years later, I can call every one of those people and they will talk to me. I learned pretty quickly that you may think you are selling a product or service but really you’re selling your self, your word and your reputation. And you should act and converse accordingly.

  40. Dan, I agree with your post on many levels. Having launched many brands large and small, I have had to work arm and arm with founders and sales people to close business with products and services that weren’t even ready for the market. Part of success was trust and a personal guarantee that we (in the marketing/sales role) would do the right thing. Often, that meant walking away from revenue when our technology wasn’t ready on time and, our actions could jeopardize the customer’s job. Many years later, I can call every one of those people and they will talk to me. I learned pretty quickly that you may think you are selling a product or service but really you’re selling your self, your word and your reputation. And you should act and converse accordingly.

  41. Dan, I agree with your post on many levels. Having launched many brands large and small, I have had to work arm and arm with founders and sales people to close business with products and services that weren’t even ready for the market. Part of success was trust and a personal guarantee that we (in the marketing/sales role) would do the right thing. Often, that meant walking away from revenue when our technology wasn’t ready on time and, our actions could jeopardize the customer’s job. Many years later, I can call every one of those people and they will talk to me. I learned pretty quickly that you may think you are selling a product or service but really you’re selling your self, your word and your reputation. And you should act and converse accordingly.

  42. Dan, I agree with your post on many levels. Having launched many brands large and small, I have had to work arm and arm with founders and sales people to close business with products and services that weren’t even ready for the market. Part of success was trust and a personal guarantee that we (in the marketing/sales role) would do the right thing. Often, that meant walking away from revenue when our technology wasn’t ready on time and, our actions could jeopardize the customer’s job. Many years later, I can call every one of those people and they will talk to me. I learned pretty quickly that you may think you are selling a product or service but really you’re selling your self, your word and your reputation. And you should act and converse accordingly.

  43. I am wondering what are you trying to say my friend. On one hand you say that asking questions is no good etc. and then in he end you say that one must heal their wounds and get them rid of their pains. My friend to heal their wounds you need to understand what ails them, what their pains are, what kind of wounds they are carrying and from when and what kind of solution they are looking for. And the prospects are not on their own going to tell you what their pains are. So how do you find out those pains? By asking questions. Good questions developed before you reach out to the prospects will surely help. All those who need help in their sales scripts developed as well as questions developed for powerful selling can get in touch with me at jamalshahmot@gmail.com, visit for more details here: http://www.salesscriptsamples.webnode.com

  44. I am wondering what are you trying to say my friend. On one hand you say that asking questions is no good etc. and then in he end you say that one must heal their wounds and get them rid of their pains. My friend to heal their wounds you need to understand what ails them, what their pains are, what kind of wounds they are carrying and from when and what kind of solution they are looking for. And the prospects are not on their own going to tell you what their pains are. So how do you find out those pains? By asking questions. Good questions developed before you reach out to the prospects will surely help. All those who need help in their sales scripts developed as well as questions developed for powerful selling can get in touch with me at jamalshahmot@gmail.com, visit for more details here: http://www.salesscriptsamples.webnode.com

  45. I am wondering what are you trying to say my friend. On one hand you say that asking questions is no good etc. and then in he end you say that one must heal their wounds and get them rid of their pains. My friend to heal their wounds you need to understand what ails them, what their pains are, what kind of wounds they are carrying and from when and what kind of solution they are looking for. And the prospects are not on their own going to tell you what their pains are. So how do you find out those pains? By asking questions. Good questions developed before you reach out to the prospects will surely help. All those who need help in their sales scripts developed as well as questions developed for powerful selling can get in touch with me at jamalshahmot@gmail.com, visit for more details here: http://www.salesscriptsamples.webnode.com

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