Working Smarter is for Chumps.

Let’s talk candidly between the two of us.
You don’t need to be any smarter than you already are.

You already have enough brains to be successful. You already know enough to do something amazing.

It’s true. You’re already a genius.

You just need to start working like that. Like you know where you want to go is. Like you are unstoppable.

Don’t get me wrong.  That’s certainly not easy.  Frankly, it flies in the face of much of what you have heard in your lifetime.

Over the last few decades, numerous books have been written about the need to work smarter. Experts preach to you the latest tricks in being effective and productive. You have access to complex tools to help you get things done no matter where you are.

If you listen to the gurus, you just need to be efficient and effective, have a process, and take each day a step at a time. If you do that you are destined to be successful.

But that’s just not the truth.

It sounds good. Every fiber of your being wants to believe that it really is that simple. But deep down, you know that’s not the formula for achieving wild success.

It’s not.  It’s the lie you tell yourself in order to excuse away the hard truth. The truth that relentless hard work is the only way to achieve outrageous goals. Working smarter has nothing to do with.

Whether you are looking for a job, trying to land a monster client,or navigating your way up the corporate ladder — the answer is the same.  You have to be willing to put in mind-bending amounts of massive effort. That’s the formula.

It really is that simple.

Sure, you will get smarter along the way.  When you’re done putting in massive amounts of effort you will be working more efficiently than when you started.  But that “smarter” is a byproduct of effort — not the secret to success.

Name one amazing, world changing idea that was brought to bear by working smarter. It doesn’t exist.

  • It took one of the world’s greatest inventors, Thomas Edison, over 10,000 tries in order to create the all lightbulb.  Not just brains, hard work.
  • It took a smart team of engineers, led by the handicapped John Roebling, over 13 years to build the Brooklyn Bridge.  Smart?  Of course.  But courageous effort is what made it happen.
  • It took one of history’s most memorable World War II leaders, Winston Churchill, over 60 years to win his first election. He was simply relentless.

Example after example after example throughout history make it clear that being smart is simply overrrated.  In fact, it can hold you back.  It can convince you to never get started.

The secret to achieving greatness is simply to work hard.

Harder than you ever imagined possible.

You can’t shortcut effort by getting another college degree or by Googling “seven step solutions” to the problems in front of you. You just have to to work through them.

One step at a time.  One day at a time.  With eyes focused on what you want for yourself.  You just work.  And work and work and work.  And along the way you might get smarter. But you might not.

One thing is certain if you keep working, you will be successful.

Whether it’s a job search or a new relationship. Whether it’s more money you want or just to feel satisfied with your life.  All of it comes down to how hard you are willing to work at it.

If you are willing, you can’t be stopped.

And that’s a nice thing to know. That eventually you’ll get there.

0 Replies to “Working Smarter is for Chumps.”

  1. Once again pal you hit the nail on the head. The work smarter not harder crowd are basing their argument on a premise that success is a result of intellect and insight when as the man said the world is “full of educated derelicts.”

  2. Once again pal you hit the nail on the head. The work smarter not harder crowd are basing their argument on a premise that success is a result of intellect and insight when as the man said the world is “full of educated derelicts.”

  3. Once again pal you hit the nail on the head. The work smarter not harder crowd are basing their argument on a premise that success is a result of intellect and insight when as the man said the world is “full of educated derelicts.”

  4. Once again pal you hit the nail on the head. The work smarter not harder crowd are basing their argument on a premise that success is a result of intellect and insight when as the man said the world is “full of educated derelicts.”

  5. Once again pal you hit the nail on the head. The work smarter not harder crowd are basing their argument on a premise that success is a result of intellect and insight when as the man said the world is “full of educated derelicts.”

  6. Once again pal you hit the nail on the head. The work smarter not harder crowd are basing their argument on a premise that success is a result of intellect and insight when as the man said the world is “full of educated derelicts.”

  7. Dan: I admire and agree with your admonition that success in B2B sales all starts with hard work. I’d add to your point, however, the importance of learning as a by-product of such hard work. Craftsmanship may emerge from 10,000 hours of practice, but it’s practice of things that knowingly work, not practice of things that I’m told should work. As Twyla Tharpe notes, practice doesn’t make perfect; perfect practice makes perfect. Trust this adds some value. – John  

    1. Hey John, good points.  
      How do you “know” (for double-dog sure…) what “knowingly works”?  That’s the point of my article.  Just because something works for me doesn’t mean that you can copy me and it works the same way for you.

      So what do I do then?  If I can’t copy you (and you can’t copy me) what works?  I don’t think you can easily define that.  Which is why outrageous success always seem to emerge in all the oddest of places.

      It comes to bear from the relentless pursuit of answers.  You keep looking and innovating long after those around you think it “smart”.  Right?

      It’s hard, hard, hard work.  That’s the genesis.  You don’t trust that what you are practicing will work.  You trust that through relentless hard work you can figure out the answer to the problems in front of you.

      Dan

      p.s. Anything else and you just find yourself floundering….  Right?  

      p.s.s. BTW, I would rather error on the side of effort over innovation.  Effort always seems to lead to innovation.  But it’s not the other way around.  

  8. Dan: I admire and agree with your admonition that success in B2B sales all starts with hard work. I’d add to your point, however, the importance of learning as a by-product of such hard work. Craftsmanship may emerge from 10,000 hours of practice, but it’s practice of things that knowingly work, not practice of things that I’m told should work. As Twyla Tharpe notes, practice doesn’t make perfect; perfect practice makes perfect. Trust this adds some value. – John  

    1. Hey John, good points.  
      How do you “know” (for double-dog sure…) what “knowingly works”?  That’s the point of my article.  Just because something works for me doesn’t mean that you can copy me and it works the same way for you.

      So what do I do then?  If I can’t copy you (and you can’t copy me) what works?  I don’t think you can easily define that.  Which is why outrageous success always seem to emerge in all the oddest of places.

      It comes to bear from the relentless pursuit of answers.  You keep looking and innovating long after those around you think it “smart”.  Right?

      It’s hard, hard, hard work.  That’s the genesis.  You don’t trust that what you are practicing will work.  You trust that through relentless hard work you can figure out the answer to the problems in front of you.

      Dan

      p.s. Anything else and you just find yourself floundering….  Right?  

      p.s.s. BTW, I would rather error on the side of effort over innovation.  Effort always seems to lead to innovation.  But it’s not the other way around.  

  9. Dan: I admire and agree with your admonition that success in B2B sales all starts with hard work. I’d add to your point, however, the importance of learning as a by-product of such hard work. Craftsmanship may emerge from 10,000 hours of practice, but it’s practice of things that knowingly work, not practice of things that I’m told should work. As Twyla Tharpe notes, practice doesn’t make perfect; perfect practice makes perfect. Trust this adds some value. – John  

    1. Hey John, good points.  
      How do you “know” (for double-dog sure…) what “knowingly works”?  That’s the point of my article.  Just because something works for me doesn’t mean that you can copy me and it works the same way for you.

      So what do I do then?  If I can’t copy you (and you can’t copy me) what works?  I don’t think you can easily define that.  Which is why outrageous success always seem to emerge in all the oddest of places.

      It comes to bear from the relentless pursuit of answers.  You keep looking and innovating long after those around you think it “smart”.  Right?

      It’s hard, hard, hard work.  That’s the genesis.  You don’t trust that what you are practicing will work.  You trust that through relentless hard work you can figure out the answer to the problems in front of you.

      Dan

      p.s. Anything else and you just find yourself floundering….  Right?  

      p.s.s. BTW, I would rather error on the side of effort over innovation.  Effort always seems to lead to innovation.  But it’s not the other way around.  

  10. Dan: I admire and agree with your admonition that success in B2B sales all starts with hard work. I’d add to your point, however, the importance of learning as a by-product of such hard work. Craftsmanship may emerge from 10,000 hours of practice, but it’s practice of things that knowingly work, not practice of things that I’m told should work. As Twyla Tharpe notes, practice doesn’t make perfect; perfect practice makes perfect. Trust this adds some value. – John  

    1. Hey John, good points.  
      How do you “know” (for double-dog sure…) what “knowingly works”?  That’s the point of my article.  Just because something works for me doesn’t mean that you can copy me and it works the same way for you.

      So what do I do then?  If I can’t copy you (and you can’t copy me) what works?  I don’t think you can easily define that.  Which is why outrageous success always seem to emerge in all the oddest of places.

      It comes to bear from the relentless pursuit of answers.  You keep looking and innovating long after those around you think it “smart”.  Right?

      It’s hard, hard, hard work.  That’s the genesis.  You don’t trust that what you are practicing will work.  You trust that through relentless hard work you can figure out the answer to the problems in front of you.

      Dan

      p.s. Anything else and you just find yourself floundering….  Right?  

      p.s.s. BTW, I would rather error on the side of effort over innovation.  Effort always seems to lead to innovation.  But it’s not the other way around.  

  11. Dan: I admire and agree with your admonition that success in B2B sales all starts with hard work. I’d add to your point, however, the importance of learning as a by-product of such hard work. Craftsmanship may emerge from 10,000 hours of practice, but it’s practice of things that knowingly work, not practice of things that I’m told should work. As Twyla Tharpe notes, practice doesn’t make perfect; perfect practice makes perfect. Trust this adds some value. – John  

    1. Hey John, good points.  
      How do you “know” (for double-dog sure…) what “knowingly works”?  That’s the point of my article.  Just because something works for me doesn’t mean that you can copy me and it works the same way for you.

      So what do I do then?  If I can’t copy you (and you can’t copy me) what works?  I don’t think you can easily define that.  Which is why outrageous success always seem to emerge in all the oddest of places.

      It comes to bear from the relentless pursuit of answers.  You keep looking and innovating long after those around you think it “smart”.  Right?

      It’s hard, hard, hard work.  That’s the genesis.  You don’t trust that what you are practicing will work.  You trust that through relentless hard work you can figure out the answer to the problems in front of you.

      Dan

      p.s. Anything else and you just find yourself floundering….  Right?  

      p.s.s. BTW, I would rather error on the side of effort over innovation.  Effort always seems to lead to innovation.  But it’s not the other way around.  

  12. Dan: I admire and agree with your admonition that success in B2B sales all starts with hard work. I’d add to your point, however, the importance of learning as a by-product of such hard work. Craftsmanship may emerge from 10,000 hours of practice, but it’s practice of things that knowingly work, not practice of things that I’m told should work. As Twyla Tharpe notes, practice doesn’t make perfect; perfect practice makes perfect. Trust this adds some value. – John  

    1. Hey John, good points.  
      How do you “know” (for double-dog sure…) what “knowingly works”?  That’s the point of my article.  Just because something works for me doesn’t mean that you can copy me and it works the same way for you.

      So what do I do then?  If I can’t copy you (and you can’t copy me) what works?  I don’t think you can easily define that.  Which is why outrageous success always seem to emerge in all the oddest of places.

      It comes to bear from the relentless pursuit of answers.  You keep looking and innovating long after those around you think it “smart”.  Right?

      It’s hard, hard, hard work.  That’s the genesis.  You don’t trust that what you are practicing will work.  You trust that through relentless hard work you can figure out the answer to the problems in front of you.

      Dan

      p.s. Anything else and you just find yourself floundering….  Right?  

      p.s.s. BTW, I would rather error on the side of effort over innovation.  Effort always seems to lead to innovation.  But it’s not the other way around.  

  13. Dan C: Good on you to challenge ‘blind faith’ in any arguments [including mine] for working smarter. On this, I’m on your side. My premise, however, is that [in addition to hard work] success is a result of the courage and curiosity it takes to try new approaches, and the learning that can come from observing [with metrics] whether or not the new approach produces a better or worse result than the approaches I’ve always used.
    When it’s possible to measurably detect ineffective tactics and, in doing so, nudge + coach Reps on healthier sales practices they should try, we’re seeing the odds of success improve. A FitBit and a personal trainer don’t eliminate the need for me to exercise to improve my odds of living longer. But they can be one hell of a healthy reminder of the long term value of what I’ve accomplished today with their help.

    Dan W: hard work is a healthy first step to success. IMO, it’s not enough. Without learning, effort’s well intentioned. With learning, effort’s well done.

      1. Dan: I agree. A Return-on-Effort requires effort for there to be a return. Let’s just not satisfy ourselves with effort in the hope it produces a return.
        Working smarter is about learning how to produce so much of a Return-on-Effort that we can save money on the whips and chains others might want to requisition to ensure effort’s invested. When you’re on the rocks, measurable proof of what’s working and what isn’t, in your B2B sales practices, will get you off the rocks and into smoother waters far faster than all the paddling in the world. – John

    1. I believe we are in agreement John. My primary argument with the ‘smarter not harder’ crowd is twofold. One the premise that they are mutually exclusive concepts and – two the inference that any of us is really ‘smarter’ than anyone else is an ego driven concept. The only thing I know for sure is ‘that i know nothing’. Bottom line is you are right – courage, curiosity, and learning to apply new approaches with metrics that measure those activities are critical. I guess my main peeve is we all can and should be working harder AND smarter as opposed to advocating one over the other.

      1. You can sum it all quite simply.  If you have to error on one side, the “effort” side has a better chance of taking you to your goals.  
        1. More business leaders fail because of lack of effort than in NOT knowing the right things to do.  
        2. Working harder natural leads to working smarter.  But the opposite isn’t true.

        You can do both.  But you have to start with massive amounts of effort.  That’s the beginning.  It’s not something you do some fo the time.

        Dan

  14. Dan C: Good on you to challenge ‘blind faith’ in any arguments [including mine] for working smarter. On this, I’m on your side. My premise, however, is that [in addition to hard work] success is a result of the courage and curiosity it takes to try new approaches, and the learning that can come from observing [with metrics] whether or not the new approach produces a better or worse result than the approaches I’ve always used.
    When it’s possible to measurably detect ineffective tactics and, in doing so, nudge + coach Reps on healthier sales practices they should try, we’re seeing the odds of success improve. A FitBit and a personal trainer don’t eliminate the need for me to exercise to improve my odds of living longer. But they can be one hell of a healthy reminder of the long term value of what I’ve accomplished today with their help.

    Dan W: hard work is a healthy first step to success. IMO, it’s not enough. Without learning, effort’s well intentioned. With learning, effort’s well done.

      1. Dan: I agree. A Return-on-Effort requires effort for there to be a return. Let’s just not satisfy ourselves with effort in the hope it produces a return.
        Working smarter is about learning how to produce so much of a Return-on-Effort that we can save money on the whips and chains others might want to requisition to ensure effort’s invested. When you’re on the rocks, measurable proof of what’s working and what isn’t, in your B2B sales practices, will get you off the rocks and into smoother waters far faster than all the paddling in the world. – John

    1. I believe we are in agreement John. My primary argument with the ‘smarter not harder’ crowd is twofold. One the premise that they are mutually exclusive concepts and – two the inference that any of us is really ‘smarter’ than anyone else is an ego driven concept. The only thing I know for sure is ‘that i know nothing’. Bottom line is you are right – courage, curiosity, and learning to apply new approaches with metrics that measure those activities are critical. I guess my main peeve is we all can and should be working harder AND smarter as opposed to advocating one over the other.

      1. You can sum it all quite simply.  If you have to error on one side, the “effort” side has a better chance of taking you to your goals.  
        1. More business leaders fail because of lack of effort than in NOT knowing the right things to do.  
        2. Working harder natural leads to working smarter.  But the opposite isn’t true.

        You can do both.  But you have to start with massive amounts of effort.  That’s the beginning.  It’s not something you do some fo the time.

        Dan

  15. Dan C: Good on you to challenge ‘blind faith’ in any arguments [including mine] for working smarter. On this, I’m on your side. My premise, however, is that [in addition to hard work] success is a result of the courage and curiosity it takes to try new approaches, and the learning that can come from observing [with metrics] whether or not the new approach produces a better or worse result than the approaches I’ve always used.
    When it’s possible to measurably detect ineffective tactics and, in doing so, nudge + coach Reps on healthier sales practices they should try, we’re seeing the odds of success improve. A FitBit and a personal trainer don’t eliminate the need for me to exercise to improve my odds of living longer. But they can be one hell of a healthy reminder of the long term value of what I’ve accomplished today with their help.

    Dan W: hard work is a healthy first step to success. IMO, it’s not enough. Without learning, effort’s well intentioned. With learning, effort’s well done.

      1. Dan: I agree. A Return-on-Effort requires effort for there to be a return. Let’s just not satisfy ourselves with effort in the hope it produces a return.
        Working smarter is about learning how to produce so much of a Return-on-Effort that we can save money on the whips and chains others might want to requisition to ensure effort’s invested. When you’re on the rocks, measurable proof of what’s working and what isn’t, in your B2B sales practices, will get you off the rocks and into smoother waters far faster than all the paddling in the world. – John

    1. I believe we are in agreement John. My primary argument with the ‘smarter not harder’ crowd is twofold. One the premise that they are mutually exclusive concepts and – two the inference that any of us is really ‘smarter’ than anyone else is an ego driven concept. The only thing I know for sure is ‘that i know nothing’. Bottom line is you are right – courage, curiosity, and learning to apply new approaches with metrics that measure those activities are critical. I guess my main peeve is we all can and should be working harder AND smarter as opposed to advocating one over the other.

      1. You can sum it all quite simply.  If you have to error on one side, the “effort” side has a better chance of taking you to your goals.  
        1. More business leaders fail because of lack of effort than in NOT knowing the right things to do.  
        2. Working harder natural leads to working smarter.  But the opposite isn’t true.

        You can do both.  But you have to start with massive amounts of effort.  That’s the beginning.  It’s not something you do some fo the time.

        Dan

  16. Dan C: Good on you to challenge ‘blind faith’ in any arguments [including mine] for working smarter. On this, I’m on your side. My premise, however, is that [in addition to hard work] success is a result of the courage and curiosity it takes to try new approaches, and the learning that can come from observing [with metrics] whether or not the new approach produces a better or worse result than the approaches I’ve always used.
    When it’s possible to measurably detect ineffective tactics and, in doing so, nudge + coach Reps on healthier sales practices they should try, we’re seeing the odds of success improve. A FitBit and a personal trainer don’t eliminate the need for me to exercise to improve my odds of living longer. But they can be one hell of a healthy reminder of the long term value of what I’ve accomplished today with their help.

    Dan W: hard work is a healthy first step to success. IMO, it’s not enough. Without learning, effort’s well intentioned. With learning, effort’s well done.

      1. Dan: I agree. A Return-on-Effort requires effort for there to be a return. Let’s just not satisfy ourselves with effort in the hope it produces a return.
        Working smarter is about learning how to produce so much of a Return-on-Effort that we can save money on the whips and chains others might want to requisition to ensure effort’s invested. When you’re on the rocks, measurable proof of what’s working and what isn’t, in your B2B sales practices, will get you off the rocks and into smoother waters far faster than all the paddling in the world. – John

    1. I believe we are in agreement John. My primary argument with the ‘smarter not harder’ crowd is twofold. One the premise that they are mutually exclusive concepts and – two the inference that any of us is really ‘smarter’ than anyone else is an ego driven concept. The only thing I know for sure is ‘that i know nothing’. Bottom line is you are right – courage, curiosity, and learning to apply new approaches with metrics that measure those activities are critical. I guess my main peeve is we all can and should be working harder AND smarter as opposed to advocating one over the other.

      1. You can sum it all quite simply.  If you have to error on one side, the “effort” side has a better chance of taking you to your goals.  
        1. More business leaders fail because of lack of effort than in NOT knowing the right things to do.  
        2. Working harder natural leads to working smarter.  But the opposite isn’t true.

        You can do both.  But you have to start with massive amounts of effort.  That’s the beginning.  It’s not something you do some fo the time.

        Dan

  17. Dan C: Good on you to challenge ‘blind faith’ in any arguments [including mine] for working smarter. On this, I’m on your side. My premise, however, is that [in addition to hard work] success is a result of the courage and curiosity it takes to try new approaches, and the learning that can come from observing [with metrics] whether or not the new approach produces a better or worse result than the approaches I’ve always used.
    When it’s possible to measurably detect ineffective tactics and, in doing so, nudge + coach Reps on healthier sales practices they should try, we’re seeing the odds of success improve. A FitBit and a personal trainer don’t eliminate the need for me to exercise to improve my odds of living longer. But they can be one hell of a healthy reminder of the long term value of what I’ve accomplished today with their help.

    Dan W: hard work is a healthy first step to success. IMO, it’s not enough. Without learning, effort’s well intentioned. With learning, effort’s well done.

      1. Dan: I agree. A Return-on-Effort requires effort for there to be a return. Let’s just not satisfy ourselves with effort in the hope it produces a return.
        Working smarter is about learning how to produce so much of a Return-on-Effort that we can save money on the whips and chains others might want to requisition to ensure effort’s invested. When you’re on the rocks, measurable proof of what’s working and what isn’t, in your B2B sales practices, will get you off the rocks and into smoother waters far faster than all the paddling in the world. – John

    1. I believe we are in agreement John. My primary argument with the ‘smarter not harder’ crowd is twofold. One the premise that they are mutually exclusive concepts and – two the inference that any of us is really ‘smarter’ than anyone else is an ego driven concept. The only thing I know for sure is ‘that i know nothing’. Bottom line is you are right – courage, curiosity, and learning to apply new approaches with metrics that measure those activities are critical. I guess my main peeve is we all can and should be working harder AND smarter as opposed to advocating one over the other.

      1. You can sum it all quite simply.  If you have to error on one side, the “effort” side has a better chance of taking you to your goals.  
        1. More business leaders fail because of lack of effort than in NOT knowing the right things to do.  
        2. Working harder natural leads to working smarter.  But the opposite isn’t true.

        You can do both.  But you have to start with massive amounts of effort.  That’s the beginning.  It’s not something you do some fo the time.

        Dan

  18. Dan C: Good on you to challenge ‘blind faith’ in any arguments [including mine] for working smarter. On this, I’m on your side. My premise, however, is that [in addition to hard work] success is a result of the courage and curiosity it takes to try new approaches, and the learning that can come from observing [with metrics] whether or not the new approach produces a better or worse result than the approaches I’ve always used.
    When it’s possible to measurably detect ineffective tactics and, in doing so, nudge + coach Reps on healthier sales practices they should try, we’re seeing the odds of success improve. A FitBit and a personal trainer don’t eliminate the need for me to exercise to improve my odds of living longer. But they can be one hell of a healthy reminder of the long term value of what I’ve accomplished today with their help.

    Dan W: hard work is a healthy first step to success. IMO, it’s not enough. Without learning, effort’s well intentioned. With learning, effort’s well done.

      1. Dan: I agree. A Return-on-Effort requires effort for there to be a return. Let’s just not satisfy ourselves with effort in the hope it produces a return.
        Working smarter is about learning how to produce so much of a Return-on-Effort that we can save money on the whips and chains others might want to requisition to ensure effort’s invested. When you’re on the rocks, measurable proof of what’s working and what isn’t, in your B2B sales practices, will get you off the rocks and into smoother waters far faster than all the paddling in the world. – John

    1. I believe we are in agreement John. My primary argument with the ‘smarter not harder’ crowd is twofold. One the premise that they are mutually exclusive concepts and – two the inference that any of us is really ‘smarter’ than anyone else is an ego driven concept. The only thing I know for sure is ‘that i know nothing’. Bottom line is you are right – courage, curiosity, and learning to apply new approaches with metrics that measure those activities are critical. I guess my main peeve is we all can and should be working harder AND smarter as opposed to advocating one over the other.

      1. You can sum it all quite simply.  If you have to error on one side, the “effort” side has a better chance of taking you to your goals.  
        1. More business leaders fail because of lack of effort than in NOT knowing the right things to do.  
        2. Working harder natural leads to working smarter.  But the opposite isn’t true.

        You can do both.  But you have to start with massive amounts of effort.  That’s the beginning.  It’s not something you do some fo the time.

        Dan

  19. Interesting discussion. It’s important to have a strategy for how to accomplish tasks in a certain time. i.e., working smart. More importantly, though, you need to put those plans into action first. You’ll figure out how to get around obstacles during the execution phase. The execution phase is, of course, when you’re working extremely hard to get the job done.The learning happens during the whole process of actually doing. In other words, plan, initiate, work hard, and see what you can learn from what you’ve accomplished. The whole process is your education…
     

    1. That’s right, Cara.  The destination is the journey.  But you can’t just think about it.  You have to move with certainty and deliberation LONG after it is fun.
      You learn along the way.  You don’t start learning and then start working.  That’s a recipe for very doing anything.

      BTW, how are things for you?

      Dan

  20. Interesting discussion. It’s important to have a strategy for how to accomplish tasks in a certain time. i.e., working smart. More importantly, though, you need to put those plans into action first. You’ll figure out how to get around obstacles during the execution phase. The execution phase is, of course, when you’re working extremely hard to get the job done.The learning happens during the whole process of actually doing. In other words, plan, initiate, work hard, and see what you can learn from what you’ve accomplished. The whole process is your education…
     

    1. That’s right, Cara.  The destination is the journey.  But you can’t just think about it.  You have to move with certainty and deliberation LONG after it is fun.
      You learn along the way.  You don’t start learning and then start working.  That’s a recipe for very doing anything.

      BTW, how are things for you?

      Dan

  21. Interesting discussion. It’s important to have a strategy for how to accomplish tasks in a certain time. i.e., working smart. More importantly, though, you need to put those plans into action first. You’ll figure out how to get around obstacles during the execution phase. The execution phase is, of course, when you’re working extremely hard to get the job done.The learning happens during the whole process of actually doing. In other words, plan, initiate, work hard, and see what you can learn from what you’ve accomplished. The whole process is your education…
     

    1. That’s right, Cara.  The destination is the journey.  But you can’t just think about it.  You have to move with certainty and deliberation LONG after it is fun.
      You learn along the way.  You don’t start learning and then start working.  That’s a recipe for very doing anything.

      BTW, how are things for you?

      Dan

  22. Interesting discussion. It’s important to have a strategy for how to accomplish tasks in a certain time. i.e., working smart. More importantly, though, you need to put those plans into action first. You’ll figure out how to get around obstacles during the execution phase. The execution phase is, of course, when you’re working extremely hard to get the job done.The learning happens during the whole process of actually doing. In other words, plan, initiate, work hard, and see what you can learn from what you’ve accomplished. The whole process is your education…
     

    1. That’s right, Cara.  The destination is the journey.  But you can’t just think about it.  You have to move with certainty and deliberation LONG after it is fun.
      You learn along the way.  You don’t start learning and then start working.  That’s a recipe for very doing anything.

      BTW, how are things for you?

      Dan

  23. Interesting discussion. It’s important to have a strategy for how to accomplish tasks in a certain time. i.e., working smart. More importantly, though, you need to put those plans into action first. You’ll figure out how to get around obstacles during the execution phase. The execution phase is, of course, when you’re working extremely hard to get the job done.The learning happens during the whole process of actually doing. In other words, plan, initiate, work hard, and see what you can learn from what you’ve accomplished. The whole process is your education…
     

    1. That’s right, Cara.  The destination is the journey.  But you can’t just think about it.  You have to move with certainty and deliberation LONG after it is fun.
      You learn along the way.  You don’t start learning and then start working.  That’s a recipe for very doing anything.

      BTW, how are things for you?

      Dan

  24. Interesting discussion. It’s important to have a strategy for how to accomplish tasks in a certain time. i.e., working smart. More importantly, though, you need to put those plans into action first. You’ll figure out how to get around obstacles during the execution phase. The execution phase is, of course, when you’re working extremely hard to get the job done.The learning happens during the whole process of actually doing. In other words, plan, initiate, work hard, and see what you can learn from what you’ve accomplished. The whole process is your education…
     

    1. That’s right, Cara.  The destination is the journey.  But you can’t just think about it.  You have to move with certainty and deliberation LONG after it is fun.
      You learn along the way.  You don’t start learning and then start working.  That’s a recipe for very doing anything.

      BTW, how are things for you?

      Dan

  25. Dan: If Abraham Lincoln were alive today, I think he would present a strong counter-argument to your ideas.  In one of his lectures on discoveries and inventions, he said “For instance, it is quite certain that ever since water has been boiled in covered vessels, men have seen the lids of the vessels rise and fall a little, with a sort of fluttering motion, by force of the steam; but so long as this was not specially observed, and reflected and experimented upon, it came to nothing.”  
    I’m not sure he’d buy your hard work argument, because he eloquently describes what learning is, and why it’s vital for invention.

    If hard work alone works for you, great!  Keep doing it, and skip the accumulation of knowledge part.

    I’m not sure you’ve done Edison, Roebling, and Churchill justice:  “Not just brains, hard work,” . . .  “But courageous effort is what made it happen” . . . “He was simply relentless.”  Wow.  These are incredible simplifications.  Time and space don’t allow me to take all of these on, but if you read a history of the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, you will understand very quickly that the ‘working smarter’ or ‘learning’ part that Lincoln described was as much a part of the mix as ‘courageous effort.’ In fact, at the time, it’s doubtful that Roebling thought of his project that way.  In his mind he was building a bridge that was a complex engineering challenge.  I don’t know of a single great inventor who started to write history before he or she achieved a significant goal.

    1. You bring up a good point that learning from your life experiences is vital.
      Like your quote with Abraham Lincoln, let me make another observation:  At 100 degrees you make hot coffee.  At 211 degrees you have really hot coffee.  But at 212 degree you have steam power — which allows you to propel a boat or a plane or an electric plant.

      One degree of extra effort makes that difference.  Broad strokes? Yes.  

      But the sames formula applies from Lincoln back to Roebling.  Without effort, there is no learning.  There is no experience.  There is nothing other than education and ideas — which are useless with effort.  

      And outrageous ideas demand outrageous amounts of effort. Were Roebling and Edison brilliant?  Of course…  But Edison himself made the famous observation that “Genius is one percent inspiration, ninety-nine percent perspiration”…

      If I have to error on the side of “taking it too far” I have to take the side of effort.  How often are we telling people to “learn” over “doing something”?  

      You can’t turn the ship if it isn’t moving…

      Dan

      p.s.  Sorry for the 900 different metaphors.

  26. Dan: If Abraham Lincoln were alive today, I think he would present a strong counter-argument to your ideas.  In one of his lectures on discoveries and inventions, he said “For instance, it is quite certain that ever since water has been boiled in covered vessels, men have seen the lids of the vessels rise and fall a little, with a sort of fluttering motion, by force of the steam; but so long as this was not specially observed, and reflected and experimented upon, it came to nothing.”  
    I’m not sure he’d buy your hard work argument, because he eloquently describes what learning is, and why it’s vital for invention.

    If hard work alone works for you, great!  Keep doing it, and skip the accumulation of knowledge part.

    I’m not sure you’ve done Edison, Roebling, and Churchill justice:  “Not just brains, hard work,” . . .  “But courageous effort is what made it happen” . . . “He was simply relentless.”  Wow.  These are incredible simplifications.  Time and space don’t allow me to take all of these on, but if you read a history of the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, you will understand very quickly that the ‘working smarter’ or ‘learning’ part that Lincoln described was as much a part of the mix as ‘courageous effort.’ In fact, at the time, it’s doubtful that Roebling thought of his project that way.  In his mind he was building a bridge that was a complex engineering challenge.  I don’t know of a single great inventor who started to write history before he or she achieved a significant goal.

    1. You bring up a good point that learning from your life experiences is vital.
      Like your quote with Abraham Lincoln, let me make another observation:  At 100 degrees you make hot coffee.  At 211 degrees you have really hot coffee.  But at 212 degree you have steam power — which allows you to propel a boat or a plane or an electric plant.

      One degree of extra effort makes that difference.  Broad strokes? Yes.  

      But the sames formula applies from Lincoln back to Roebling.  Without effort, there is no learning.  There is no experience.  There is nothing other than education and ideas — which are useless with effort.  

      And outrageous ideas demand outrageous amounts of effort. Were Roebling and Edison brilliant?  Of course…  But Edison himself made the famous observation that “Genius is one percent inspiration, ninety-nine percent perspiration”…

      If I have to error on the side of “taking it too far” I have to take the side of effort.  How often are we telling people to “learn” over “doing something”?  

      You can’t turn the ship if it isn’t moving…

      Dan

      p.s.  Sorry for the 900 different metaphors.

  27. Dan: If Abraham Lincoln were alive today, I think he would present a strong counter-argument to your ideas.  In one of his lectures on discoveries and inventions, he said “For instance, it is quite certain that ever since water has been boiled in covered vessels, men have seen the lids of the vessels rise and fall a little, with a sort of fluttering motion, by force of the steam; but so long as this was not specially observed, and reflected and experimented upon, it came to nothing.”  
    I’m not sure he’d buy your hard work argument, because he eloquently describes what learning is, and why it’s vital for invention.

    If hard work alone works for you, great!  Keep doing it, and skip the accumulation of knowledge part.

    I’m not sure you’ve done Edison, Roebling, and Churchill justice:  “Not just brains, hard work,” . . .  “But courageous effort is what made it happen” . . . “He was simply relentless.”  Wow.  These are incredible simplifications.  Time and space don’t allow me to take all of these on, but if you read a history of the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, you will understand very quickly that the ‘working smarter’ or ‘learning’ part that Lincoln described was as much a part of the mix as ‘courageous effort.’ In fact, at the time, it’s doubtful that Roebling thought of his project that way.  In his mind he was building a bridge that was a complex engineering challenge.  I don’t know of a single great inventor who started to write history before he or she achieved a significant goal.

    1. You bring up a good point that learning from your life experiences is vital.
      Like your quote with Abraham Lincoln, let me make another observation:  At 100 degrees you make hot coffee.  At 211 degrees you have really hot coffee.  But at 212 degree you have steam power — which allows you to propel a boat or a plane or an electric plant.

      One degree of extra effort makes that difference.  Broad strokes? Yes.  

      But the sames formula applies from Lincoln back to Roebling.  Without effort, there is no learning.  There is no experience.  There is nothing other than education and ideas — which are useless with effort.  

      And outrageous ideas demand outrageous amounts of effort. Were Roebling and Edison brilliant?  Of course…  But Edison himself made the famous observation that “Genius is one percent inspiration, ninety-nine percent perspiration”…

      If I have to error on the side of “taking it too far” I have to take the side of effort.  How often are we telling people to “learn” over “doing something”?  

      You can’t turn the ship if it isn’t moving…

      Dan

      p.s.  Sorry for the 900 different metaphors.

  28. Dan: If Abraham Lincoln were alive today, I think he would present a strong counter-argument to your ideas.  In one of his lectures on discoveries and inventions, he said “For instance, it is quite certain that ever since water has been boiled in covered vessels, men have seen the lids of the vessels rise and fall a little, with a sort of fluttering motion, by force of the steam; but so long as this was not specially observed, and reflected and experimented upon, it came to nothing.”  
    I’m not sure he’d buy your hard work argument, because he eloquently describes what learning is, and why it’s vital for invention.

    If hard work alone works for you, great!  Keep doing it, and skip the accumulation of knowledge part.

    I’m not sure you’ve done Edison, Roebling, and Churchill justice:  “Not just brains, hard work,” . . .  “But courageous effort is what made it happen” . . . “He was simply relentless.”  Wow.  These are incredible simplifications.  Time and space don’t allow me to take all of these on, but if you read a history of the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, you will understand very quickly that the ‘working smarter’ or ‘learning’ part that Lincoln described was as much a part of the mix as ‘courageous effort.’ In fact, at the time, it’s doubtful that Roebling thought of his project that way.  In his mind he was building a bridge that was a complex engineering challenge.  I don’t know of a single great inventor who started to write history before he or she achieved a significant goal.

    1. You bring up a good point that learning from your life experiences is vital.
      Like your quote with Abraham Lincoln, let me make another observation:  At 100 degrees you make hot coffee.  At 211 degrees you have really hot coffee.  But at 212 degree you have steam power — which allows you to propel a boat or a plane or an electric plant.

      One degree of extra effort makes that difference.  Broad strokes? Yes.  

      But the sames formula applies from Lincoln back to Roebling.  Without effort, there is no learning.  There is no experience.  There is nothing other than education and ideas — which are useless with effort.  

      And outrageous ideas demand outrageous amounts of effort. Were Roebling and Edison brilliant?  Of course…  But Edison himself made the famous observation that “Genius is one percent inspiration, ninety-nine percent perspiration”…

      If I have to error on the side of “taking it too far” I have to take the side of effort.  How often are we telling people to “learn” over “doing something”?  

      You can’t turn the ship if it isn’t moving…

      Dan

      p.s.  Sorry for the 900 different metaphors.

  29. Dan: If Abraham Lincoln were alive today, I think he would present a strong counter-argument to your ideas.  In one of his lectures on discoveries and inventions, he said “For instance, it is quite certain that ever since water has been boiled in covered vessels, men have seen the lids of the vessels rise and fall a little, with a sort of fluttering motion, by force of the steam; but so long as this was not specially observed, and reflected and experimented upon, it came to nothing.”  
    I’m not sure he’d buy your hard work argument, because he eloquently describes what learning is, and why it’s vital for invention.

    If hard work alone works for you, great!  Keep doing it, and skip the accumulation of knowledge part.

    I’m not sure you’ve done Edison, Roebling, and Churchill justice:  “Not just brains, hard work,” . . .  “But courageous effort is what made it happen” . . . “He was simply relentless.”  Wow.  These are incredible simplifications.  Time and space don’t allow me to take all of these on, but if you read a history of the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, you will understand very quickly that the ‘working smarter’ or ‘learning’ part that Lincoln described was as much a part of the mix as ‘courageous effort.’ In fact, at the time, it’s doubtful that Roebling thought of his project that way.  In his mind he was building a bridge that was a complex engineering challenge.  I don’t know of a single great inventor who started to write history before he or she achieved a significant goal.

    1. You bring up a good point that learning from your life experiences is vital.
      Like your quote with Abraham Lincoln, let me make another observation:  At 100 degrees you make hot coffee.  At 211 degrees you have really hot coffee.  But at 212 degree you have steam power — which allows you to propel a boat or a plane or an electric plant.

      One degree of extra effort makes that difference.  Broad strokes? Yes.  

      But the sames formula applies from Lincoln back to Roebling.  Without effort, there is no learning.  There is no experience.  There is nothing other than education and ideas — which are useless with effort.  

      And outrageous ideas demand outrageous amounts of effort. Were Roebling and Edison brilliant?  Of course…  But Edison himself made the famous observation that “Genius is one percent inspiration, ninety-nine percent perspiration”…

      If I have to error on the side of “taking it too far” I have to take the side of effort.  How often are we telling people to “learn” over “doing something”?  

      You can’t turn the ship if it isn’t moving…

      Dan

      p.s.  Sorry for the 900 different metaphors.

  30. Dan: If Abraham Lincoln were alive today, I think he would present a strong counter-argument to your ideas.  In one of his lectures on discoveries and inventions, he said “For instance, it is quite certain that ever since water has been boiled in covered vessels, men have seen the lids of the vessels rise and fall a little, with a sort of fluttering motion, by force of the steam; but so long as this was not specially observed, and reflected and experimented upon, it came to nothing.”  
    I’m not sure he’d buy your hard work argument, because he eloquently describes what learning is, and why it’s vital for invention.

    If hard work alone works for you, great!  Keep doing it, and skip the accumulation of knowledge part.

    I’m not sure you’ve done Edison, Roebling, and Churchill justice:  “Not just brains, hard work,” . . .  “But courageous effort is what made it happen” . . . “He was simply relentless.”  Wow.  These are incredible simplifications.  Time and space don’t allow me to take all of these on, but if you read a history of the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, you will understand very quickly that the ‘working smarter’ or ‘learning’ part that Lincoln described was as much a part of the mix as ‘courageous effort.’ In fact, at the time, it’s doubtful that Roebling thought of his project that way.  In his mind he was building a bridge that was a complex engineering challenge.  I don’t know of a single great inventor who started to write history before he or she achieved a significant goal.

    1. You bring up a good point that learning from your life experiences is vital.
      Like your quote with Abraham Lincoln, let me make another observation:  At 100 degrees you make hot coffee.  At 211 degrees you have really hot coffee.  But at 212 degree you have steam power — which allows you to propel a boat or a plane or an electric plant.

      One degree of extra effort makes that difference.  Broad strokes? Yes.  

      But the sames formula applies from Lincoln back to Roebling.  Without effort, there is no learning.  There is no experience.  There is nothing other than education and ideas — which are useless with effort.  

      And outrageous ideas demand outrageous amounts of effort. Were Roebling and Edison brilliant?  Of course…  But Edison himself made the famous observation that “Genius is one percent inspiration, ninety-nine percent perspiration”…

      If I have to error on the side of “taking it too far” I have to take the side of effort.  How often are we telling people to “learn” over “doing something”?  

      You can’t turn the ship if it isn’t moving…

      Dan

      p.s.  Sorry for the 900 different metaphors.

  31. I wonder if the dissenters here believe most of the people they know to want better results are just too stupid to get those results or if they might just need to throw themselves with a reckless abandon into the work. 
    It is certain the ideas aren’t mutually exclusive. But most people would do better by simply upping the hustle! I have yet to meet many who are willing to outwork someone with the hustle. 

    A

  32. I wonder if the dissenters here believe most of the people they know to want better results are just too stupid to get those results or if they might just need to throw themselves with a reckless abandon into the work. 
    It is certain the ideas aren’t mutually exclusive. But most people would do better by simply upping the hustle! I have yet to meet many who are willing to outwork someone with the hustle. 

    A

  33. I wonder if the dissenters here believe most of the people they know to want better results are just too stupid to get those results or if they might just need to throw themselves with a reckless abandon into the work. 
    It is certain the ideas aren’t mutually exclusive. But most people would do better by simply upping the hustle! I have yet to meet many who are willing to outwork someone with the hustle. 

    A

  34. I wonder if the dissenters here believe most of the people they know to want better results are just too stupid to get those results or if they might just need to throw themselves with a reckless abandon into the work. 
    It is certain the ideas aren’t mutually exclusive. But most people would do better by simply upping the hustle! I have yet to meet many who are willing to outwork someone with the hustle. 

    A

  35. I wonder if the dissenters here believe most of the people they know to want better results are just too stupid to get those results or if they might just need to throw themselves with a reckless abandon into the work. 
    It is certain the ideas aren’t mutually exclusive. But most people would do better by simply upping the hustle! I have yet to meet many who are willing to outwork someone with the hustle. 

    A

  36. I wonder if the dissenters here believe most of the people they know to want better results are just too stupid to get those results or if they might just need to throw themselves with a reckless abandon into the work. 
    It is certain the ideas aren’t mutually exclusive. But most people would do better by simply upping the hustle! I have yet to meet many who are willing to outwork someone with the hustle. 

    A

  37. For me it never gets old to be reminded to work hard.  I don’t think it will ever become a cliche’ either.  And honestly, how awesome is it to admit to yourself, when your head hits the pillow at the end of the day, body exhausted, that you’ve worked your ass off that day.  It’s a great feeling.

  38. For me it never gets old to be reminded to work hard.  I don’t think it will ever become a cliche’ either.  And honestly, how awesome is it to admit to yourself, when your head hits the pillow at the end of the day, body exhausted, that you’ve worked your ass off that day.  It’s a great feeling.

  39. For me it never gets old to be reminded to work hard.  I don’t think it will ever become a cliche’ either.  And honestly, how awesome is it to admit to yourself, when your head hits the pillow at the end of the day, body exhausted, that you’ve worked your ass off that day.  It’s a great feeling.

  40. For me it never gets old to be reminded to work hard.  I don’t think it will ever become a cliche’ either.  And honestly, how awesome is it to admit to yourself, when your head hits the pillow at the end of the day, body exhausted, that you’ve worked your ass off that day.  It’s a great feeling.

  41. For me it never gets old to be reminded to work hard.  I don’t think it will ever become a cliche’ either.  And honestly, how awesome is it to admit to yourself, when your head hits the pillow at the end of the day, body exhausted, that you’ve worked your ass off that day.  It’s a great feeling.

  42. For me it never gets old to be reminded to work hard.  I don’t think it will ever become a cliche’ either.  And honestly, how awesome is it to admit to yourself, when your head hits the pillow at the end of the day, body exhausted, that you’ve worked your ass off that day.  It’s a great feeling.

  43. Hi Dan-“The truth that relentless hard work is the only way to achieve outrageous goals. Working smarter has nothing to do with.”
    Love this, thank you. Hope you are staying motivated in changing the world,

  44. Hi Dan-“The truth that relentless hard work is the only way to achieve outrageous goals. Working smarter has nothing to do with.”
    Love this, thank you. Hope you are staying motivated in changing the world,

  45. Hi Dan-“The truth that relentless hard work is the only way to achieve outrageous goals. Working smarter has nothing to do with.”
    Love this, thank you. Hope you are staying motivated in changing the world,

  46. Hi Dan-“The truth that relentless hard work is the only way to achieve outrageous goals. Working smarter has nothing to do with.”
    Love this, thank you. Hope you are staying motivated in changing the world,

  47. Hi Dan-“The truth that relentless hard work is the only way to achieve outrageous goals. Working smarter has nothing to do with.”
    Love this, thank you. Hope you are staying motivated in changing the world,

  48. Hi Dan-“The truth that relentless hard work is the only way to achieve outrageous goals. Working smarter has nothing to do with.”
    Love this, thank you. Hope you are staying motivated in changing the world,

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