You’re Unfit to Succeed.

The truth is, you’re not fit to succeed.
What’s holding you back isn’t an advanced college degree, the right connections, or more money in the bank.

It’s discipline.

Most of the time we think of discipline as a series of tasks that we need to complete in order to achieve success. A few key action items that we need to repeat day after day after day.  And that’s part of what ultimately determines how successful you become. But most of success has less to do with what you are willing to do and more about what you are willing to deny yourself.

And that’s hard.  Brutally hard.  Gut-wrenching hard.

So instead of toughing it out, you just decide to “let this one slide”.  And the next one.  And the one after that.

And day by day, month by month, you become more and more unfit to succeed.

The person you’ve become is lazy and petty, dishonest and passive agressive.

You’re not a champion.  You’re not a warrior.  You aren’t fit to succeed.

1. You aren’t financially fit.

You can’t take bold risks if you’re chained to bad financial decisions. Mismanaging your personal finances is the fastest way to guarantee that you never achieve big goals for yourself.

You can’t take the risks that are necessary to succeed when you have to work a job to pay the bills and credit cards and too-big-of-a-car payment and a vacation timeshare and all the other “necessities” you just had to have.

You don’t need all that stuff. And you know that now. But the reality is that you’re stuck making the payments. And you will be for months and years to come. Which means you won’t be able to start succeeding for months and years to come.

Because you couldn’t deny yourself a little bit of pleasure, you have to put your dreams on hold to make sure you don’t default on the poor decisions you made.

You aren’t financially fit to succeed. And like with a lot of things in life, you “get what you pay for”.

You can’t pay for anything else. So you won’t be successful for a while.

2.  You aren’t physcially fit.

You can’t achieve big dreams without getting beaten up. It’s tasking to endure the physical stress of hard work and limited sleep. You have to be a warrior, in both mindset and physique, in order to conquer.

That doesn’t mean that you need to be a vegetarian or adopt eating habits that are outrageous. But it does mean that you need to be careful of how you fuel your body. You can’t complain about “not being with it” when you put junk food in your body.

The same thing applies to exercise. A strong body allows you to endure the rigors of a long day of work. But that’s not all, exercise gives you time to think.  To innovate past the obstacles in your way.

You can’t achieve greatness when you are always sick or tired.  You can’t go the distance in your business when you can’t go the distance with your body.

You’re physically unfit to succeed. And it literally cripples you.

3.  You aren’t mentally fit.

You can’t conquer your dreams if you can’t conquer your demons. The demons in your head.

It’s easy to let fear and pain and bad past experiences build up in your mind. That’s what happens naturally. Unless you actively take time to guard what you think about you end up mentally at the lowest common denominator.  Which is never good for your future.

Instead of being inspired by the possibilities of overcoming complex obstacles in your way, all you can think about is what other people think about you or “how this could all fall apart”.  Nothing that is healthy.

And like all journeys, if you can’t see a path forward, you won’t find your way home. If you can’t think creatively beyond the mental obstacles in your way, you won’t find the creative breakthrough you need to achieve success.

You can’t do amazing things without an amazing mindset. Your attitude is killing you. Killing your dream.

You’re unfit to succeed.

It’s not about what you are doing, it’s about what you’re not denying yourself.

It’s about your lack of discipline.

And it’s all connected. Bad personal habits spill over into bad business habits. Bad personal thoughts turn into bad business thoughts.

You have to get in shape. You have to start thinking differently. Living differently. Spending differently.

Day after day, month after month — and then you’ll begin to notice a difference. You’re a little more ready to take on life. You’re a little less timid when problems come at you. You’re not scared by the obstacles in your way.

Your fit to succeed. You’re ready.

And that makes all the difference in achieving success. You being fit.

0 Replies to “You’re Unfit to Succeed.”

  1. Pointing that bony prophet finger again, eh? I don’t want to need a kick in the rump, but often, I kind of do. And you’re right, I probably didn’t need that Kindle Fire. I kind of wrote a post about this recently… the tendency to ‘stop tomorrow.’ Tomorrow is always tomorrow. That can be a problem.

  2. Pointing that bony prophet finger again, eh? I don’t want to need a kick in the rump, but often, I kind of do. And you’re right, I probably didn’t need that Kindle Fire. I kind of wrote a post about this recently… the tendency to ‘stop tomorrow.’ Tomorrow is always tomorrow. That can be a problem.

  3. Pointing that bony prophet finger again, eh? I don’t want to need a kick in the rump, but often, I kind of do. And you’re right, I probably didn’t need that Kindle Fire. I kind of wrote a post about this recently… the tendency to ‘stop tomorrow.’ Tomorrow is always tomorrow. That can be a problem.

  4. Pointing that bony prophet finger again, eh? I don’t want to need a kick in the rump, but often, I kind of do. And you’re right, I probably didn’t need that Kindle Fire. I kind of wrote a post about this recently… the tendency to ‘stop tomorrow.’ Tomorrow is always tomorrow. That can be a problem.

  5. Pointing that bony prophet finger again, eh? I don’t want to need a kick in the rump, but often, I kind of do. And you’re right, I probably didn’t need that Kindle Fire. I kind of wrote a post about this recently… the tendency to ‘stop tomorrow.’ Tomorrow is always tomorrow. That can be a problem.

  6. Pointing that bony prophet finger again, eh? I don’t want to need a kick in the rump, but often, I kind of do. And you’re right, I probably didn’t need that Kindle Fire. I kind of wrote a post about this recently… the tendency to ‘stop tomorrow.’ Tomorrow is always tomorrow. That can be a problem.

  7. Outstanding post! I recently came to a very similar conclusion. As I have begun taking positive steps and leaving negative habits behind I have noticed that the pain experienced during this transition is most acute in the beginning, while at the same time the benefits you earn from pushing through are at their lowest. i.e. it hurt a lot more to run my first two mile route than it did to built up to four miles over time. This applies to any of the above three subjects.

    To counter this during the toughest of times I have begin to visualize my future self egging me on. Letting me know how incredibly well this all turns out, how it is completely worth all of this effort. Beyond that I picture him thanking me for all of my hard work and for following through with such discipline because without the current me fighting for my future he will not exist.

    1. Hey Xander,

      Thanks for sharing your personal story with us. You bring up an excellent idea for staying motivating. You visualize your success. That’s HUGE. Because if you can’t see it, you won’t achieve it…

      Dan

  8. Outstanding post! I recently came to a very similar conclusion. As I have begun taking positive steps and leaving negative habits behind I have noticed that the pain experienced during this transition is most acute in the beginning, while at the same time the benefits you earn from pushing through are at their lowest. i.e. it hurt a lot more to run my first two mile route than it did to built up to four miles over time. This applies to any of the above three subjects.

    To counter this during the toughest of times I have begin to visualize my future self egging me on. Letting me know how incredibly well this all turns out, how it is completely worth all of this effort. Beyond that I picture him thanking me for all of my hard work and for following through with such discipline because without the current me fighting for my future he will not exist.

    1. Hey Xander,

      Thanks for sharing your personal story with us. You bring up an excellent idea for staying motivating. You visualize your success. That’s HUGE. Because if you can’t see it, you won’t achieve it…

      Dan

  9. Outstanding post! I recently came to a very similar conclusion. As I have begun taking positive steps and leaving negative habits behind I have noticed that the pain experienced during this transition is most acute in the beginning, while at the same time the benefits you earn from pushing through are at their lowest. i.e. it hurt a lot more to run my first two mile route than it did to built up to four miles over time. This applies to any of the above three subjects.

    To counter this during the toughest of times I have begin to visualize my future self egging me on. Letting me know how incredibly well this all turns out, how it is completely worth all of this effort. Beyond that I picture him thanking me for all of my hard work and for following through with such discipline because without the current me fighting for my future he will not exist.

    1. Hey Xander,

      Thanks for sharing your personal story with us. You bring up an excellent idea for staying motivating. You visualize your success. That’s HUGE. Because if you can’t see it, you won’t achieve it…

      Dan

  10. Outstanding post! I recently came to a very similar conclusion. As I have begun taking positive steps and leaving negative habits behind I have noticed that the pain experienced during this transition is most acute in the beginning, while at the same time the benefits you earn from pushing through are at their lowest. i.e. it hurt a lot more to run my first two mile route than it did to built up to four miles over time. This applies to any of the above three subjects.

    To counter this during the toughest of times I have begin to visualize my future self egging me on. Letting me know how incredibly well this all turns out, how it is completely worth all of this effort. Beyond that I picture him thanking me for all of my hard work and for following through with such discipline because without the current me fighting for my future he will not exist.

    1. Hey Xander,

      Thanks for sharing your personal story with us. You bring up an excellent idea for staying motivating. You visualize your success. That’s HUGE. Because if you can’t see it, you won’t achieve it…

      Dan

  11. Outstanding post! I recently came to a very similar conclusion. As I have begun taking positive steps and leaving negative habits behind I have noticed that the pain experienced during this transition is most acute in the beginning, while at the same time the benefits you earn from pushing through are at their lowest. i.e. it hurt a lot more to run my first two mile route than it did to built up to four miles over time. This applies to any of the above three subjects.

    To counter this during the toughest of times I have begin to visualize my future self egging me on. Letting me know how incredibly well this all turns out, how it is completely worth all of this effort. Beyond that I picture him thanking me for all of my hard work and for following through with such discipline because without the current me fighting for my future he will not exist.

    1. Hey Xander,

      Thanks for sharing your personal story with us. You bring up an excellent idea for staying motivating. You visualize your success. That’s HUGE. Because if you can’t see it, you won’t achieve it…

      Dan

  12. Outstanding post! I recently came to a very similar conclusion. As I have begun taking positive steps and leaving negative habits behind I have noticed that the pain experienced during this transition is most acute in the beginning, while at the same time the benefits you earn from pushing through are at their lowest. i.e. it hurt a lot more to run my first two mile route than it did to built up to four miles over time. This applies to any of the above three subjects.

    To counter this during the toughest of times I have begin to visualize my future self egging me on. Letting me know how incredibly well this all turns out, how it is completely worth all of this effort. Beyond that I picture him thanking me for all of my hard work and for following through with such discipline because without the current me fighting for my future he will not exist.

    1. Hey Xander,

      Thanks for sharing your personal story with us. You bring up an excellent idea for staying motivating. You visualize your success. That’s HUGE. Because if you can’t see it, you won’t achieve it…

      Dan

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