Successfully Failing.

There is something incredibly honest about failing brilliantly. About laying it all on the line and still coming up short.
When you just decide that you are going to try something audacious. Despite the odds. Despite the pressure. Despite your inadequacies.

You are simply going to attempt to achieve what others consider to be ridiculously difficult.

You can’t do that without failing.

Failing big.

And yet we find it hard to be honest about our failure. It’s difficult for us to talk about how many times we really have come up short of our own expectations for ourselves.

We pretend like we’ve accomplished an unbroken string of outrageous successes when we’ve simply tried and failed and tried and failed and tried failed. ¬†We’ve attempted greatness as flawed people.

That is what is valiant. That’s honesty.

So why pretend otherwise. Why play games and shift blame? Why wear masks and refuse vulnerability?

Why not embrace our humanity?

Perhaps it is because success for each of us is so deeply personal. So wired into the core of who we are as leaders.

We fail to realize that our dreams are tougher than we are. Our dreams are not as frail as our ambitions for achieving them.

Big dreams demand big failure along the way. To not fail is to not achieve.

And to deny failure is to deny the power of who you are. And what you are capable of achieving.

The lesson for us all is to embrace failure.

To learn from it. To let it empower us beyond our wildest expectations.

 

0 Replies to “Successfully Failing.”

  1. Fear-based people always have a reason not to try. They see it failing before they even really know what it is. True entrepreneurs try all kinds of ideas, and some things are wildly successful and some things you just need to know when to walk away. Maybe it was a brilliant idea, once you got down the road with it–not so great. Two outcomes to everything–you either make money, or you learn something. Both are valuable and contribute to each other.

  2. Fear-based people always have a reason not to try. They see it failing before they even really know what it is. True entrepreneurs try all kinds of ideas, and some things are wildly successful and some things you just need to know when to walk away. Maybe it was a brilliant idea, once you got down the road with it–not so great. Two outcomes to everything–you either make money, or you learn something. Both are valuable and contribute to each other.

  3. Fear-based people always have a reason not to try. They see it failing before they even really know what it is. True entrepreneurs try all kinds of ideas, and some things are wildly successful and some things you just need to know when to walk away. Maybe it was a brilliant idea, once you got down the road with it–not so great. Two outcomes to everything–you either make money, or you learn something. Both are valuable and contribute to each other.

  4. Fear-based people always have a reason not to try. They see it failing before they even really know what it is. True entrepreneurs try all kinds of ideas, and some things are wildly successful and some things you just need to know when to walk away. Maybe it was a brilliant idea, once you got down the road with it–not so great. Two outcomes to everything–you either make money, or you learn something. Both are valuable and contribute to each other.

  5. Fear-based people always have a reason not to try. They see it failing before they even really know what it is. True entrepreneurs try all kinds of ideas, and some things are wildly successful and some things you just need to know when to walk away. Maybe it was a brilliant idea, once you got down the road with it–not so great. Two outcomes to everything–you either make money, or you learn something. Both are valuable and contribute to each other.

  6. Fear-based people always have a reason not to try. They see it failing before they even really know what it is. True entrepreneurs try all kinds of ideas, and some things are wildly successful and some things you just need to know when to walk away. Maybe it was a brilliant idea, once you got down the road with it–not so great. Two outcomes to everything–you either make money, or you learn something. Both are valuable and contribute to each other.

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