The Power of Believing Your Own Insanity.

Let’s face it.  If you don’t believe in you no else is either.
You might be crazy.  You might be wrong.  You might be both.

(Chances are you are..)

But that’s OK as long as you believe in you.  That’s the key.  Passion.  Purpose.  Relentless drive.

And it’s not always easy to do.

Especially when it gets tough.

You can’t give up.  You can’t believe the critics.  You can get distracted by failures in your past.

You have to believe that you’ll figure it out.  That you’ll come through with the answer when you need it most.

And the truth is that you probably will.  Think back to your hardest struggles in the past.

You get to the edge of the cliff and look over.

It seems like it’s over.  You look down and all you see is disaster.

But somehow you figure it out.  In spite of the stress and the chaos and your impending doom, you find a meaning to the insanity.  A way down.

And it all works out because you never stop believing in you.  That’s the secret.

Your belief is what makes the difference.

It drives you to be more creative.

To work harder.  To muscle past the obstacles holding you back.  Pushing you down.

You have to believe in you first.  

Don’t forget that. You’re the only “Fan Club” you need.

No one else needs to agree with you, support you, or even like you. Those are “nice to haves”.  And in a world where you are focused on changing the conversation, nothing is easy or nice.

Most of what you do looks like insanity to those around you.

But that’s OK.  You know where you are going.  And you believe you can do the impossible.

So keep believing.  Fight to keep your dream alive.

What’s seems like insanity now might be the next big idea that changes the world.

That’s worth believing in.

0 Replies to “The Power of Believing Your Own Insanity.”

  1. This reminds me of ‘The Dip’, the book written by Seth Godin. The basic hypothesis of the book is that there comes a time in any difficult endeavour when you ask yourself whether to continue or whether to bail out. The key to success (he thought) was knowing whether your endeavour was worth sticking at it, and then having the determination to do so whilst others fell by the wayside.

  2. This reminds me of ‘The Dip’, the book written by Seth Godin. The basic hypothesis of the book is that there comes a time in any difficult endeavour when you ask yourself whether to continue or whether to bail out. The key to success (he thought) was knowing whether your endeavour was worth sticking at it, and then having the determination to do so whilst others fell by the wayside.

  3. This reminds me of ‘The Dip’, the book written by Seth Godin. The basic hypothesis of the book is that there comes a time in any difficult endeavour when you ask yourself whether to continue or whether to bail out. The key to success (he thought) was knowing whether your endeavour was worth sticking at it, and then having the determination to do so whilst others fell by the wayside.

  4. This reminds me of ‘The Dip’, the book written by Seth Godin. The basic hypothesis of the book is that there comes a time in any difficult endeavour when you ask yourself whether to continue or whether to bail out. The key to success (he thought) was knowing whether your endeavour was worth sticking at it, and then having the determination to do so whilst others fell by the wayside.

  5. This reminds me of ‘The Dip’, the book written by Seth Godin. The basic hypothesis of the book is that there comes a time in any difficult endeavour when you ask yourself whether to continue or whether to bail out. The key to success (he thought) was knowing whether your endeavour was worth sticking at it, and then having the determination to do so whilst others fell by the wayside.

  6. This reminds me of ‘The Dip’, the book written by Seth Godin. The basic hypothesis of the book is that there comes a time in any difficult endeavour when you ask yourself whether to continue or whether to bail out. The key to success (he thought) was knowing whether your endeavour was worth sticking at it, and then having the determination to do so whilst others fell by the wayside.

  7. Dan,This is a great post and so true to my experiences. I’m a cancer survivor who spent the summer of 2010 riding a bicycle across America to raise awareness and money for cancer. Many saw this as a “crazy” quest. I was tired of dreaming about the ride and felt it was high time to get ‘er done (lol).

    There was a moment in Tennessee when my team wanted to quit and it seemed impossible to carry on. I called my father and he started helping to patch together an alternative I could do on my own. Rent a car, drive to the next destination and ride back and then forward.

    Luckily we never had to use my dad’s plan since it would have taken much longer than the 60 days it took, but knowing my father, who shares my CLL Leukemia diagnosis, didn’t think I was nuts meant a lot.

    At times it feels like I’ve spent my career tilting at windmills, but, as your post points out, passionate jousting is all good :). Thanks,k

    Marty

    P.S. You can read more about my ride at http://www.MartinsRide.com. Thanks for the inspirational post.

  8. Dan,This is a great post and so true to my experiences. I’m a cancer survivor who spent the summer of 2010 riding a bicycle across America to raise awareness and money for cancer. Many saw this as a “crazy” quest. I was tired of dreaming about the ride and felt it was high time to get ‘er done (lol).

    There was a moment in Tennessee when my team wanted to quit and it seemed impossible to carry on. I called my father and he started helping to patch together an alternative I could do on my own. Rent a car, drive to the next destination and ride back and then forward.

    Luckily we never had to use my dad’s plan since it would have taken much longer than the 60 days it took, but knowing my father, who shares my CLL Leukemia diagnosis, didn’t think I was nuts meant a lot.

    At times it feels like I’ve spent my career tilting at windmills, but, as your post points out, passionate jousting is all good :). Thanks,k

    Marty

    P.S. You can read more about my ride at http://www.MartinsRide.com. Thanks for the inspirational post.

  9. Dan,This is a great post and so true to my experiences. I’m a cancer survivor who spent the summer of 2010 riding a bicycle across America to raise awareness and money for cancer. Many saw this as a “crazy” quest. I was tired of dreaming about the ride and felt it was high time to get ‘er done (lol).

    There was a moment in Tennessee when my team wanted to quit and it seemed impossible to carry on. I called my father and he started helping to patch together an alternative I could do on my own. Rent a car, drive to the next destination and ride back and then forward.

    Luckily we never had to use my dad’s plan since it would have taken much longer than the 60 days it took, but knowing my father, who shares my CLL Leukemia diagnosis, didn’t think I was nuts meant a lot.

    At times it feels like I’ve spent my career tilting at windmills, but, as your post points out, passionate jousting is all good :). Thanks,k

    Marty

    P.S. You can read more about my ride at http://www.MartinsRide.com. Thanks for the inspirational post.

  10. Dan,This is a great post and so true to my experiences. I’m a cancer survivor who spent the summer of 2010 riding a bicycle across America to raise awareness and money for cancer. Many saw this as a “crazy” quest. I was tired of dreaming about the ride and felt it was high time to get ‘er done (lol).

    There was a moment in Tennessee when my team wanted to quit and it seemed impossible to carry on. I called my father and he started helping to patch together an alternative I could do on my own. Rent a car, drive to the next destination and ride back and then forward.

    Luckily we never had to use my dad’s plan since it would have taken much longer than the 60 days it took, but knowing my father, who shares my CLL Leukemia diagnosis, didn’t think I was nuts meant a lot.

    At times it feels like I’ve spent my career tilting at windmills, but, as your post points out, passionate jousting is all good :). Thanks,k

    Marty

    P.S. You can read more about my ride at http://www.MartinsRide.com. Thanks for the inspirational post.

  11. Dan,This is a great post and so true to my experiences. I’m a cancer survivor who spent the summer of 2010 riding a bicycle across America to raise awareness and money for cancer. Many saw this as a “crazy” quest. I was tired of dreaming about the ride and felt it was high time to get ‘er done (lol).

    There was a moment in Tennessee when my team wanted to quit and it seemed impossible to carry on. I called my father and he started helping to patch together an alternative I could do on my own. Rent a car, drive to the next destination and ride back and then forward.

    Luckily we never had to use my dad’s plan since it would have taken much longer than the 60 days it took, but knowing my father, who shares my CLL Leukemia diagnosis, didn’t think I was nuts meant a lot.

    At times it feels like I’ve spent my career tilting at windmills, but, as your post points out, passionate jousting is all good :). Thanks,k

    Marty

    P.S. You can read more about my ride at http://www.MartinsRide.com. Thanks for the inspirational post.

  12. Dan,This is a great post and so true to my experiences. I’m a cancer survivor who spent the summer of 2010 riding a bicycle across America to raise awareness and money for cancer. Many saw this as a “crazy” quest. I was tired of dreaming about the ride and felt it was high time to get ‘er done (lol).

    There was a moment in Tennessee when my team wanted to quit and it seemed impossible to carry on. I called my father and he started helping to patch together an alternative I could do on my own. Rent a car, drive to the next destination and ride back and then forward.

    Luckily we never had to use my dad’s plan since it would have taken much longer than the 60 days it took, but knowing my father, who shares my CLL Leukemia diagnosis, didn’t think I was nuts meant a lot.

    At times it feels like I’ve spent my career tilting at windmills, but, as your post points out, passionate jousting is all good :). Thanks,k

    Marty

    P.S. You can read more about my ride at http://www.MartinsRide.com. Thanks for the inspirational post.

  13. Love it. Life always seems to be a self fulfilling prophecy. Getting yourself and your team to have a deep true belief seems to be the most important thing in running a succesful business.

  14. Love it. Life always seems to be a self fulfilling prophecy. Getting yourself and your team to have a deep true belief seems to be the most important thing in running a succesful business.

  15. Love it. Life always seems to be a self fulfilling prophecy. Getting yourself and your team to have a deep true belief seems to be the most important thing in running a succesful business.

  16. Love it. Life always seems to be a self fulfilling prophecy. Getting yourself and your team to have a deep true belief seems to be the most important thing in running a succesful business.

  17. Love it. Life always seems to be a self fulfilling prophecy. Getting yourself and your team to have a deep true belief seems to be the most important thing in running a succesful business.

  18. Love it. Life always seems to be a self fulfilling prophecy. Getting yourself and your team to have a deep true belief seems to be the most important thing in running a succesful business.

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